Archive for January, 2010

This is an excerpt from a news paper clip regarding Uganda and their President Museveni and my opinion to the comment in bold of his.

President Museveni has started a campaign to improve household income among rural farmers to enhance the fight against poverty. The President, who visited farmers in Mukono and rewarded them for their achievements in implementing National Agriculture Advisory (Naads) programmes, pledged his commitment to fight poverty at household level.

Many people speak about development but they do not understand it because they keep on referring development to tarmac roads, electricity and schools but to me, I consider household income. If we achieve this, our road to development is done,” Mr Museveni said.

via Daily Monitor: Truth Everyday; Uganda News, Business, Travel, Sports, Elections  – Museveni launches campaign to improve household income.

What on earth is this guy thinking? “They keep on referring to development to tarmac roads, electricity and schools..” umm, HELLO!!  That is exactly WHAT development is! What is the point in having a higher “household” income when the  schools in the community lack basic items, the houses lack access to electricity, people cannot farm because of drought and lack of water, El Nino is affecting the weather and poverty and hunger are rife,  oh and also, you tell me Mr Museveni how are you going to Raise the “household income” for those rural farmers in times such as today’s droughts, in floods and the El Nino effect that has been happening in Rural and Sub-Saharan Africa (including your own Uganda). The last line of the news report says “Mukono District Chairman Francis Lukooya Mukoome asked the government to include provision of fertilisers under the Naads programme to help farmers realise their targets, saying the soils were no longer fertile.” again i ask the question how??

Instead of Mr Museveni telling his people what they need, maybe for once he needs to actually listen to his citizens! Oh, wait i forgot, this is just another Rebel leader who over threw yet another Rebel leader in a long history of Military Coup’s and rebel leaders!

What the Ugandan’s need is a President who is willing to listen to it’s people and then make decisions, not tell them what they need, how would he know when he lives his life of luxury in Kampala and they are living in poverty and suffering conditions in their counties and communities. Has he forgotten about what he was responsible for back in the 1980’s? it appears so!

George W. Bush, the worst US President ever (as far as i’m concerned) praised Mr Museveni for what he is doing for Ugandan’s, why? So that Mr Museveni would support his campaign on “Terror and Terrorism” against Saddam Hussain. Praised him for what? sending over 1 Million people into displacement camps? Leaving them with little, if any protection against the rebels they were supposedly “protecting” them from? Allowing the LRA to pillage, rape, abduct and destroy the lives of so many in Northern Uganda and since then, DRC and CAR as well as Southern Sudan!

Shame on you Mr Bush, your words ensured this guys ego swelled to the size of an elephant that he decided to change laws to initially keep himself as president until he was the age of 75 (or similar from what i’ve read).

I truly feel for the Ugandan’s as i see through their history they  have been dealt the “raw end of  the stick” so many times with Amin, Obote, Museveni, Kony and that is to just mention a few!

Mr Museveni, when 90-95% of the citizens of your country have access to electricity and clean water, then can you say that “development” is  “higher household income”

Rebecca Fowler

(*Freeuganda) – All opinions expressed on this blog are that of my own opinion and do not express those opinions of any corporations or non profits that i may belong to.

URGENT APPEAL LAUNCHED FOR HAITI CRISIS

Compassion Australia has launched an urgent appeal for the children of Haiti after the recent devastating earthquake. Compassion has more than 64,000 children supported in the country, including more than 4,600 sponsored by Australians.

* DONATE NOW

The organisation has committed 100 per cent of funds raised through the Haiti Earthquake Disaster Appeal to the people of Haiti. Compassion is not withholding ANY funds for administration purposes.

Compassion CEO Paul O’Rourke said the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated the country of Haiti this morning was cause for grave concern for the thousands of Compassion assisted children in the region.

He said the organisation had already mobilised an emergency response team from Miami that will fly to the Dominican Republic and bus into the capital of Port-au-Prince, as the airport has been closed.

via Compassion Australia.

Journal 17/01/2010

Posted: January 17, 2010 in Journals
Tags: , , , ,

So its been quite a while since i’ve written a journal  entry, so i had a bit of time today so i thought i’d update.

Well its been a huge start to 2010 for me, i’m now at “at home” activist and mum! Actually feels nice after working for the last 2.5 years.  Still suffering the after effects of my surgery (medication and i arn’t agreeing!) so i resigned my job (after lots of contemplating) and finished up in December, 2009.

Christmas with my kids and family was great, as usual we were at my mums house celebrating and then off to her “ocean house” as the kids call it for some R&R (crappy weather kept us out of the ocean and the kids wern’t too happy).

2010 kicked off for me with a big “snore” hehehe. i was sleeping through it, not really one to celebrate as with the little one’s we don’t usually go party it up. The joys of parenthood!

So this year i’m going to be focusing on my health and doing some Volunteering as well as maybe a bit of study. I’ve got some exciting things planned to venture into this year and am looking forward to the direction my life is taking.

In the last few days i’ve been watching the reports regarding the Haiti Earthquake and it’s been such a sad time for the Hatians in the last few years my thoughts and prayers go out to them and all in Haiti right now.

I urge everyone to donate even just $1 to Compassion Australia Help Haiti Fund – “The organisation has committed 100 per cent of funds raised through the Haiti Earthquake Disaster Appeal to the people of Haiti. Compassion is not withholding ANY funds for administration purposes.”

You can watch a video message here, from the C.E.O of Compassion about the Haiti Earthquake.

I hope that you can all give a little to help alot of people in Haiti.

Thanks

Rebecca (*Freeuganda)

Gulu

Former internally displaced people who have returned to their homes in Gulu District are facing shortage of clean drinking water, Daily Monitor has learnt.

In an interview over the weekend, the chairman of Palaro Sub-county in Gulu, Mr David Ngole, said women walk for over 15 kilometres in search of drinking water. Mr Ngole urged the government to intervene immediately, adding that any delay could severely frustrate resettlement efforts in the war battered district.

Danger

“They are exposed to rapists at night and snake bites as they travel in the bush in search of water,” he added. Mr Ngole added that water sources in villages like Abwoc Bel, Wipolo, Owalo and Kalali dried up when people were still in the camps.

Meanwhile, the Secretary of Works and Technical Services, Mr Alex Otim, said some women are forced to collect rain water from mud ponds. “Some of them drink unsafe water and this exposes them to risks of getting bilharzia,” Mr Otim said. He added that the council would make provision of safe water and roads a priority.

Official figures indicate that in Gulu District alone, over 85 per cent of former displaced persons have returned home and several camps have been closed. The Lord’s Resistance Army insurgency displaced thousands of people in northern and eastern Uganda and forced them into camps.

As reported via Daily Monitor: Truth Everyday; Uganda News, Business, Travel, Sports, Elections  – Gulu residents trek miles for water.

Some of the patients at Gulu hospital sleeping on spring beds without mattresses

By Chris Ocowun

MANY patients at Gulu referral hospital sleep on the floor, or on beds without mattresses. Terezina Akot, 60, said she was forced to buy papyrus mats to spread on the floor for her patient.

“When we came we found all the beds occupied. We had to buy papyrus mats. That is where we sleep with many other patients,” Akot narrated.

She told The New Vision last Thursday that other patients sleep on clothing.

Conditions at night are said to be worse with patients and their caretakers fighting for space on the ward floors with some sleeping in the corridors.

“Even the drugs are not enough. After surgical operations, the medical workers tell us to buy medicine. I have been here for one month and bought drugs worth sh16,000, yet there is no improvement in my condition,” said Lily Auno, who was nursing a large wound on her leg.

Conditions in the maternity ward are worse. Mothers who have just given birth are told to vacate their beds for women who are in labour.

The wards for surgery, children and out-patients are also over-crowded.

“On Mondays, more than 500 patients queue at the dispensing window to receive drugs, Others sit under the sun to wait for drugs. We used to have about 100 patients at the out-patients department on Mondays,” a medic remarked.

Nurses noted that though some of the wards have been renovated, they lacked mattresses, beddings and other accessories, and that the few remaining beds in them were in poor condition.

The medical superintendent of the hospital, Dr. Yovenito Agel Akii, acknowledged the number of inpatients in the various wards was more than double their capacity, and that there was a shortage of drugs, supplies and medical workers: “Gulu referral hospital is a 250-bed hospital and yet in the last six months, the number of our inpatients has doubled from 400-600. We receieve a budget for 250 beds and yet we are handling double this number.”

read the full report via New Vision Online : Gulu hospital lacks beds.

Zimbabwe diamond mine abuses ‘continue’

Diamond miners in Zimbabwe

It is alleged widespread human rights abuses took place in Marange

A human rights group says it is concerned about “continuing abuses” at diamond mines in Zimbabwe.

This follows a last-minute decision by Zimbabwean authorities to halt a three-day sale of about 300,000 carats of rough diamonds.

Global Witness says some mines remain in the hands of the military despite an agreement with international monitors.

Insiders have told the BBC that the sale was only halted after “blood diamond” trade monitors intervened.

“We’re obviously pleased that this auction has been cancelled but overall we’re still concerned about the situation in the diamond fields in Marange,” Global Witness’ Anne Dunnebacke told the BBC Network Africa programme.

Senior Zimbabwe’s mines ministry official Thankful Musukutwa on Thursday told a news conference in Harare that the auction had been stopped because it had not been approved by the Kimberley Process (KP), set up to regulate the trade in “blood diamonds” – those mined in conflict zones.

“No export will take place prior to certification by the KP monitor,” he told reporters.

Some 80% of sales from the planned three-day auction would have gone to the Zimbabwe government, according to reports.

read the full report via BBC News – Zimbabwe diamond mine abuses ‘continue’.

Ok so i was just generally browsing the web reading news items and i came upon this information. WOW what a bit of information, kinda makes me now understand why im sick when i eat certain foods, the crap they put in them that causes issues with our system is outrageous! I think ppl need to really consider looking into whats really in our products before we buy them, just like your shampoo, it could contain “whale oil”. – Rebecca Fowler (*Freeuganda)

Frito-Lay Study: Olestra Causes “Anal Oil Leakage”

In documents marked “Confidential and Proprietary,” Frito-Lay admits that olestra caused “anal oil leakage” in a study commissioned by the company. Olestra is the controversial non-caloric fat substitute marketed by Procter & Gamble.

Last April, Frito-Lay became the first company to market olestra-containing chips. It sold a line of “Max” potato chips and corn chips in three test markets. It is expected to begin a new test market in Indianapolis in several days.

The Frito-Lay report states: “The anal oil leakage symptoms were observed in this study (3 to 9% incidence range above background), as well as other changes in elimination. . . . Underwear spotting was statistically significant in one of two low level consumer groups at a 5% incidence above background.” Despite those problems, the authors of the report concluded that olestra-containing snacks “should have a high potential for acceptance in the marketplace.”

The Frito-Lay documents were obtained by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a nonprofit organization that has opposed the approval and use of olestra.

In addition to the “elimination changes,” Frito-Lay reported that people who consume 12 ounces or more of olestra chips a week “may experience a greater variety of gastrointestinal changes (up to a 7% incidence).” Twelve ounces is equivalent to six average 2-ounce servings of chips, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data. Those higher-level consumers experienced diarrhea, cramps, loose stools, nausea, underwear spotting, and other symptoms. All of those symptoms have been reported by numerous consumers in the four test markets for Frito-Lay’s and Procter & Gamble’s olestra snacks. People who ate less olestra experienced certain symptoms, but at lower rates.

A confidential Frito-Lay memo dated August 4, 1995, expressed concern that people would be particularly aware of digestive problems the first few times they ate olestra snacks. “There is a potential for this phenomena to affect general product acceptance.” An August 12,

1995, confidential memo reported that the company had developed a “risk management plan. . . . to manage public perception of [olestra-]related digestion issues, and to effectively handle any real issues that might emerge through the [olestra] market introduction.”

The Frito-Lay report is significant because Procter & Gamble has argued strenuously that the additive does not cause “anal leakage.” The Food and Drug Administration agreed even though CSPI had provided statistical analyses indicating that anal leakage occurred in Procter & Gamble’s own controlled studies.

Read the full report via Frito-Lay Study: Olestra Causes “Anal Oil Leakage”.

Drummers from Pink Floyd, Radiohead, Snow Patrol and the Police have taken part in a “Beat for Peace” film to try to prevent bloodshed in Sudan.

The film is one of a series of events being held in 15 countries calling on world leaders to do more to avoid a return to civil war.

At least two million people died in the conflict and campaigners fear the peace deal signed five years ago is at risk.

Gordon Brown has pledged to “step up” the UK’s role in peacekeeping in Sudan.

Displaced

On Saturday, Sudanese Archbishop Daniel Deng will speak at a gathering of hundreds of activists opposite Number 10.

Mr Brown, who will meet the archbishop on Monday, said: “Sudan’s recent history has been one too often marked by violence, insecurity, and poverty for its people.

“Sudan’s leaders – with the support of the international community – must not allow this also to be the story of Sudan’s future.”

Violence flared again in 2009, with more than 2,000 people killed and 350,000 displaced in south Sudan.

Read the full report via BBC News – Pink Floyd and Radiohead drummers in Sudan peace effort.

Kampala — THE UPDF 4th Division commander, Brig. Charles Otema Awany, has camped at Obbo village in the Central African Republic to coordinate operations against the LRA remnants headed by Joseph Kony.

The regional army spokesman, Capt. Ronald Kakurungu, said Otema took over the command against the LRA rebels from Brig. Patrick Kankiriho.

“The hardcore LRA criminals are in the Central African Republic. The issue now is when to put the final nails on them since they are already defeated,” Kakurungu told journalists at his office on Monday.

He said the situation in the north was calm with more troops deployed in the DR Congo, the Central African Republic and at all the borders to pursue the LRA rebels and ensure that they do not return to Uganda.

“We have not lost focus in these operations and our mission is to ensure that the problem of LRA rebels does not spill over to the north again,” Kakurungu noted.

Kakurungu said the army had killed 305 rebels since it launched a joint military offensive, Operation Lightning Thunder, on December 14, 2008, under the command of Kankiriho.

He said the UPDF jointly attacked the LRA hideouts with the Sudanese People’s Liberation Army and the Congolese army in an operation backed by the air force, paratroopers and infantry.

Read the full report via allAfrica.com: Central African Republic: Army in CAR to Fight Kony.

A coalition of aid agencies working in southern Sudan has called for urgent international action to save the country’s 2005 peace agreement, which it says is threatened by “a major upsurge in violence” and tensions around two key votes to be held in the next year.

“Sudan is at a crossroads,” the 10 agencies say in a report released Thursday, “and the next 12 months could determine the future of Africa’s largest nation.”

The Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) of 2005, which ended a 21-year civil war between north and south, is “extremely fragile” the agencies add. “The humanitarian situation, already one of the worst in the world, is deteriorating; and in the eyes of most ordinary southerners, meaningful post-war development has been absent.”

In a news release issued with the report, one of its co-authors, Oxfam policy adviser Maya Mailer, warned that if violence in the south escalated even further, the situation could become “one of the biggest emergencies in Africa in 2010.”

Paul Valentin, international director of Christian Aid, called for “sustained diplomatic engagement from the international community, including Sudan’s neighbours… A return to war is by no means inevitable, but it depends whether the world heeds the warning signs of the past year and has the political will to save the peace.”

The report notes that 2,500 people were killed and more than 350,000 displaced in southern Sudan last year. “Some communities and observers say that the intensity and nature of… ethnic clashes, in particular the indiscriminate killing of women, children and the elderly, has exceeded anything seen since the end of the conflict.”

Read the full report via allAfrica.com: Sudan: Major Upsurge in Violence Threatens Peace Deal, Say Aid Agencies.

OPINION

“Whilst reading a blog tonight i come across this bit of information, i thought it would be relevant to share, i really think people should also click on the link at the end and read the full report.  This is a SERIOUS issue that needs to be taken seriously, with over 1 billion going hungry each day it is our duty to act, change and be aware of what is going on in our global community. i cannot stress the urgency of the situations for those in refugee and IDP camps worldwide. Scenes of hopelessness, desperation, suffering in the face of the most resilient people i have ever seen. I Urge the Aus citizens and Government to ACT on Climate Change, help reduce our carbon footprint for our earth to survive. ” – Rebecca Fowler (*Freeuganda)

REPORT

Shorbanu Khatun of Bangladesh stood out among the thousands of suited negotiators in Copenhagen. Khatun’s husband was killed by a tiger when their land was parched by extended dry seasons and flooded with salt water, forcing him to venture into the jungle to feed his family.

Then in May, Cyclone Aila destroyed Khatun’s home, along with those of 500,000 others, forcing her to live in an internally displaced persons’ camp on an embankment with thousands of other survivors. At high tide, they are flooded up to their chests. It is hard to imagine a more arduous existence.

Khatun describes her experience over five years: “Everything seems to have changed. It is suddenly too hot. There is a severe scarcity of rain. Because it is too hot, fish have reduced significantly in the river. Skin diseases, headache and diarrhoea have become regular phenomena… I want justice for my life; for my children’s lives and livelihoods.”

But it’s hard to see how the Copenhagen Accord delivers justice to people in poor countries that are least responsible for climate change but suffer its impacts right now.

The Australian Government should see this accord as a floor, not a ceiling. It will be hard to encourage countries such as the US and China to make real progress on climate change, if our ambitions remain low.

Australia, as one of the highest per-capita polluters in the world, and the developed country most at risk from climate change, must increase its target to a science-based 40 per cent by the February deadline. We must also contribute our fair share of climate finance, based on our historical responsibility for emissions and our capacity to pay. With Treasurer Wayne Swan yesterday lauding Australia’s 19th consecutive year of growth, we can afford to do this.

Prime Minister Kevin Rudd must make clear to Australians that significant changes – in our economy, our society and our relationships with the rest of the world – are needed to meet the climate change crisis.

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott has been irresponsible in simplifying the complex debate to trite sloganeering. As the alternative leader of our nation, he needs to understand that an effective response demands change, and this will have some costs now.

As numerous studies have shown, the cost of inaction will be far greater – it will cost the Australia dearly if we see a drop in agricultural yields in the country’s food bowl, or have to cope with a rise in the number of catastrophic bushfires and severe weather events.

Globally, 300,000 people die each year from climate change and that number is rising. People like Khatun are not victims; they are finding solutions. But they need the support of the rich countries that are responsible for three-quarters of the carbon in the atmosphere.

Read the full report via Media Releases – Campaigns & Advocacy | Oxfam Australia.

At least 140 killed in Sudan violence: UN

At least 140 people have been killed and 90 wounded in the remote troubled Wunchuei region in southern Sudan over the past week, a senior UN official said on Thursday.

Clashes, apparently between rival tribal groups, occurred some time since the beginning of the year but reports emerged only after a UN security team visited the remote area by aircraft two days ago.

“Local sources on the ground said that at least 140 people had been killed, 90 wounded and 30,000 head of cattle had been stolen,” said Lise Grande, the UN Deputy Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in south Sudan.

Ms Grande said a military team of UN peacekeepers had left Thursday by vehicles to ascertain the exact situation on the ground.

“This is a matter of deep concern,” she said.

The dead were from the Dinka people common in the area. Local sources suggested that a rival group from the Nuer people were responsible, but the report could not be immediately confirmed.

Clashes between rival ethnic groups in south Sudan erupt frequently – often sparked by cattle rustling and disputes over natural resources, while others are retaliation for previous attacks.

However, a string of recent raids has shocked many, with an apparent sharp increase in attacks on women and children, as well as the targeting of homesteads.

In September, more than 100 people, including South Sudanese troops, were killed in weekend clashes in the Jonglei state after Nuer raided a Dinka village where the troops had a base.

More than 2,000 people have died and 250,000 have been displaced in inter-tribal violence across southern Sudan since January, according to the United Nations, which says the rate of violent deaths now surpasses that in the war-torn western region of Darfur.

The United Nations has warned that poor rains and food insecurity could spark further clashes, with tensions rising as pastoralist cattle herders move their animals into areas controlled by rival groups.

AFP

Read the full report here via At least 140 killed in Sudan violence: UN – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

By Phil Mercer
BBC News, Sydney

As reported on BBC NEWS

New Zealand and Australia are joining forces to carry out research on whales using non-lethal methods, in an attempt to challenge Japan’s hunting programme.

Eighteen scientists will set sail for Antarctica next month to study minke, humpback and blue whale populations.

They will also be assessing the impact of climate change on the whales.

The scientists hope their research will help to disprove Japan’s claims that whales have to be killed if they are to be properly studied.

The six-week voyage will start in Wellington in early February.

Non-lethal

Researchers will employ a range of non-lethal techniques to try to unlock some of the secrets of these giant marine mammals.

They will use air rifles fitted with darts to collect blubber and skin for DNA testing, as well attaching satellite tags to monitor the whales.

Samples of dung will also be gathered and many photographs will be taken, while acoustic instruments will record the animals’ distinctive calls.

Nick Gales from the Australian Antarctic Division, who is leading the expedition, believes it will show that Japan’s arguments for whale hunting are misguided.

“Anyone can always come up with a project that you have to kill an animal to measure something,” he said.

“But the important question is whether or not you need that information – and our view very strongly is that all of that type of information that is relevant to the conservation and management of whales can be gathered using new and very powerful non-lethal tools.”

Japan says there are genuine scientific reasons why it kills hundreds of whales each year in Antarctic waters, where its fleet is currently operating.

Critics, including the Australian and New Zealand governments, insist that such arguments are simply a cover for the sale and consumption of whale meat, which is banned under an international moratorium on commercial hunting.

Reported via BBC News – NZ, Australia research whales to challenge Japan.

DAKAR, 6 January 2010 (IRIN) – The UN World Food Programme (WFP) in Guinea is seeking funds to re-stock nutritional centres which are running out of essential fortified foods at a time of rising malnutrition.

The latest monthly nutritional survey in the capital, Conakry, showed that moderate acute malnutrition rose to 8.4 percent in December from 6.9 percent in November. The surveillance, funded by the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance, is carried out by Helen Keller International (HKI), the Health Ministry and the government humanitarian office.

Families are increasingly bringing children to NGO-supported nutritional centres but because of a shortage of corn-soya blend (CSB), vegetable oil and sugar – used for treating moderate acute malnutrition – WFP can no longer supply the centres as needed, according to agency officials.

“The demand for CSB is greater than the supply and currently we do not have the funds to furnish all nutritional centres,” Foday Turay, WFP-Guinea head of programme unit, told IRIN.

“WFP is therefore appealing urgently for funds to replenish its stocks of CSB, as well as vegetable oil and sugar, so that we can continue providing much-needed nutritional support throughout Guinea.”

WFP is seeking funds to help 25,000 children and 7,000 pregnant and lactating women.

Mamady Daffe, head of the Health Ministry’s nutrition unit, told IRIN: “Resources for malnutrition treatment are quite limited and this means the situation is worsening by the day.”

High child malnutrition rates are common throughout West Africa; some 4.5 million under-five children, or 9.9 percent, suffer acute malnutrition, according to the Food Security and Nutrition Working Group.

via IRIN Africa | GUINEA: Funds needed to stem child malnutrition – WFP | West Africa | Guinea | Children Health & Nutrition Conflict Aid Policy | News Item.

opinion by: Andrew M. Mwenda

6 January 2010 – AllAfrica Post

Kampala — Since Ndorwa West MP David Bahati introduced a bill to kill homosexuals, I have become wary of the behaviour of Uganda’s international donors. They have threatened to cut off aid if the government goes ahead with the bill. This way, they are literally using their money to blackmail government to respect gay rights. Yet this approach, although driven by good intentions, is actually counterproductive.

Those hostile to homosexuals argue that gays are promoted by the West with money to undermine African culture although they have not produced even a scintilla of evidence to support this claim. But by threatening aid cuts if the bill is passed, donors are inadvertently proving the purveyors of this argument right. Donors should learn that cultural change should be a gradual internal process. To use force to make people change their attitudes would require a high amount of coercion that is certainly undesirable. Intimidation and blackmail are not effective weapons against cultural bigotry; open debate is.

In threatening aid cuts, I suspect Western leaders are actually addressing their constituents. Their electorates see the bill as a barbaric move to suppress a fundamental right. However, donors need to be careful not to be seen to be arm-twisting the government. The biggest challenge gays and lesbians face in Uganda is not state law (however draconian) but deeply held cultural bigotry by the society.

Therefore, a democratic government would find it difficult to resist popular pressure to hang homosexuals. Multitudes of Ugandans are homophobic and would not hesitate to sanction genocide against gays. To secure attitudinal change through force would require unprecedented violence. Our challenge is how to foster openness and tolerance. This can only be achieved through open debate.

This is why although Bahati is subjectively homophobic, he is objectively an ally of gays. By introducing his bill with provisions to kill gays, he has inadvertently opened debate on a subject that has been taboo in Uganda. In the process, he has given gays and progressive intellectuals an opportunity and a platform to enlighten Ugandans about sexual diversity and expose the fallacies that inform homophobia.

Since I wrote a column criticising Bahati, I have been impressed by the number of young Ugandans who have written to me saying the debate has made them rethink their prejudice. There have been critics as well and others who wrote calling me names. I had expected worse. My column also generated fierce debate on our website with the anti-homosexual side suffering a devastating but delicious intellectual beating.

A particular problem with Ugandan society is its low levels of openness. As evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller has written, openness to experience implies curiosity, novelty seeking, broad-mindedness, interest in culture, ideas and aesthetics. Our society exhibits low levels of openness partly because of the influence of tradition.

But as our society modernises and urbanises, a new cultural sophistication is consolidating. For example, in the current debate on Bahati’s bill, the most virulent anti-gay crusaders are largely (although not entirely) from rural areas, born in peasant families, are less travelled and are not widely read. So they lack exposure to diversity. The opposite applies to most of the people who are tolerant of gays.

It is easy to tell open-minded people; they tend to seek complexity and novelty, they readily accept innovations and changes – and as Miller writes, they prefer grand new visions to mundane, predictable ruts. This sounds like a personality profile of Charles Onyango-Obbo. You cannot catch a person of his attitude and calibre in a homo-bashing rant.

People who are low on openness tend to seek simplicity and predictability; they resist change and respect tradition. They are often more conservative, close-minded, conventional and authoritarian. They follow the established cults as did their grand parents. Even in heterosexual relationships, they reject creative acts that increase intimacy. In the name of tradition, they support female genital mutilation, practice polygamy, beat their wives and want to decide for their children.

The Ugandan education system adds to the problem. At home, children are taught to obey their parents without question. In school, Students are taught to respect every opinion in a book or from the teacher instead of questioning it. That is why it is boring and frustrating reading opinions in our newspapers or listening to radio talk-shows. There is little attempt to add value to existing dogmas and beliefs.

Yet life is more complex than the “facts” that stare us in the face suggest. A person from mars visiting a small poverty stricken village in Karamoja would find people living close to the Stone Age – sleeping in grass thatched mud-huts, walking naked, cooking in medieval pots and eating from pre-historic wooden bowls. Visiting a high-tech firm in the Silicon Valley, he finds people building rockets that can navigate other planets millions of miles from the earth and yet keep sending pictures of what they observe.

It seems obvious to a casual observer from mars that the people in Karamoja are mentally inferior to those in the Silicon Valley; otherwise how do we explain such fundamental differences? Well the people in Karamoja will be black and the ones in the Silicon Valley will be white. Therefore, on the basis of this hard “evidence”, it is easy to conclude that blacks are inferior to whites in intelligence.

Actually, this “hard evidence” of white intellectual superiority was the basis of slavery, colonialism and other forms of racial injustice visited on the black race. Today, most people know that the factors that shape the economic and social destiny of peoples are varied and diverse; the colour of one’s skin has almost nothing to do with it. The difference in achievements between a worker in Google and a Karimojong cattle-herder may be rooted in the simple accident of history and geography, not their mental abilities.

As we debate Bahati’s bill, we will learn that the factors that shape human sexuality are complex and we should therefore not kill anyone because they are different. We should punish those who sexually molest children and those who rape – not because of their sexual orientation but because they violated some else’s rights while seeking sexual gratification. Happy New Year!

As reported on allAfrica.com: Uganda: Donors Blackmail On Gays Bad.

” A good read for those interested, i can see for’s and againsts for the bill and further discussion and education in Uganda about sexuality is required in order to quell the fears of those who are homophobic” Rebecca Fowler

Sheila Velez

6 January 2010

The defence in the trial of alleged Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga Dyilo – the first war crimes trial to be conducted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) – is scheduled to begin on Thursday. Ahead of the resumption of the case, Sheila Velez sketches the background.

The silence of the public gallery is interrupted only by the slow rise of the blinds. We are about to watch history in the making. Behind bulletproof glass a courtroom appears – the heart of the International Criminal Court. On the right, the prosecution. On the left, the defence, their sombre robes contrasting starkly with the courtroom’s pale wood furnishings. In their midst – dapper, calm, attentive – sits the eye of this storm: Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, the first person ever to face trial at the ICC.

Who is this man, and what has he done to earn his dubious distinction? Now quietly jotting notes, now leaning over to consult with one of his lawyers, take away the setting and he could be a businessman as unremarkable as any you encounter on the streets of London, Brussels or New York every day of the week. Hardly a Radovan Karadzic or a Pol Pot. Hardly a Josef Mengele, whose experiments on children left the few survivors scarred for life.

When the Second World War ended, nobody expected that we would ever again allow destruction on such a scale. Five decades later, so inured had we become to wholesale slaughter that five million people could die in a new Great War, the Second Congo War, and their untold sufferings would remain just that.

Until now. Because in the course of this landmark trial, not just experts but children who became the victims of this war are taking the stand to speak to the charges that as president of the Union des Patriots Congolais (UPC), between September 2002 and August 2003 Thomas Lubanga recruited, trained and used hundreds of young children to pillage, rape and kill.

Lubanga is a member of the Hema ethnic group from Ituri, a district in the northeast corner of the Congo which has about the same land area and population size as the Republic of Ireland. Born in 1960, he secured a degree in psychology from the University of Kisangani. Married, with seven children, by the late 1990s there was no particular indication that this family man would ever become a feared warlord. In fact well into the Second Congo War he was still working as a trader, selling beans in the market of Bunia, Ituri’s capital.

However, the war would set him on a path to power and notoriety, not so much for any personal military feats as for his dedication to an inherently ethnic view of politics in which the Hema as a group must either eliminate all threats or be eliminated.

From the late 1990s Ituri had become a particular focal point for violence as different factions involved in the wider war battled for control of its mineral wealth. Decades of mistrust between Ituri’s ethnic groups, particularly between the Hema and Lendu, were manipulated for political ends with deadly consequences.

In June 2000, hundreds of Hema soldiers in the Rassemblement Congolais, the movement then in control of Ituri, went to Uganda for two months’ military training. When they returned, tradesman Lubanga became their spokesman. It didn’t matter to them that he had no previous political experience. He was educated, an intellectual, and he would speak on behalf of his ethnic group. The seeds of the UPC had been planted.

In January 2001, Lubanga joined the Rassemblement Congolais government as commissioner for youth and sports. Later becoming defence commissioner, he recruited even more Hema troops. Sidelined by the Rassemblement Congolais from involvement in an April 2002 peace deal designed to end the war in the Congo, Lubanga broke away, taking his Hema soldiers with him.

Turning on his old masters, in August 2002 his forces chased the Rassemblement Congolais out of Bunia, launching attacks on the Lendu and anyone they identified as “Jajambu” (outsiders). Almost total anarchy ensued as the UPC and rival ethnic militias not only fought each other but killed civilians from opposing ethnic groups with indiscriminate barbarity. And all sides were using child soldiers.

Now, as evidence is led in an ICC courtroom at The Hague in the Netherlands, figures in green military fatigues, clapping and singing, fill screens in the public gallery. In the midst of the figures is a slightly slimmer version of the man now in the dock. The frame freezes. The deputy prosecutor’s voice cuts in.

“Witness, do you know the person who is on the screen?” The girl in the witness stand – identified only as “Witness Ten” and who even now can barely be out of her teens – confirms: “It’s Thomas Lubanga.” She adds, “There was one song. When we sang it, some people cried, like me, because I knew I didn’t have a family anymore and that I was all alone. I couldn’t really express the sadness I felt, and I couldn’t really say that I was afraid.”

By  September 2002, Thomas Lubanga had been appointed president of the UPC.  From then on he would brook no opposition. He would be not merely the president but the “Rais” – a king-like leader invested with permanent and sacred authority by his community; the protector of the Hema, in an existential war demanding the participation and contribution of every Hema man, woman and child.

Children were enticed, abducted, even given up by their parents for military training, the parents acting to protect themselves and their ethnic group. Many of the children were aged 10 to 15, some allegedly as young as five.

But why? What does a war machine gain from being fed with children?

Militias around the world in recent years have made a cynical calculation: that children can be exploited without payment; that they are loyal, obedient and unlikely to mutiny; that they show less fear in battle, are less capable of assessing risks and consequences than adults. And if they are girls, they are likely also to be useful as domestic servants and sex slaves.

“I used to be a virgin before I entered the UPC, but they took away my virginity. I saw the blood that completely destroyed my life,” Witness Ten tells the court. Murmured conversation in the public gallery falls silent. “I cry every day, for I have no mother or father. I’m alone and it’s hurting… When I think about it, I feel like killing myself.”

Elisabeth Schauer, a doctor in clinical psychology, and head of an NGO working on rehabilitation after trauma, addresses the court.

“Any experience where the perpetrator is physically close with a knife, with a gun, raping you, assaulting you; such experiences are more likely to cause us to develop psychiatric disorders,” she says. “Traumatic or emotionally important memories for us are burned into memory, right? Trauma doesn’t subside. Trauma doesn’t go away. You can be traumatised at age 11 and die with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder when you’re 70 years old.”

If the UPC was using child soldiers, it was doing nothing new. Hundreds of thousands of children are in service in armed conflicts around the world. Whatever its outcome for Thomas Lubanga, the message this trial sends is new: Use children as soldiers, even in a war as lawless as that in the Congo, and one day you may forfeit your liberty.  So for anyone who values children, the future of our world, this trial matters.

Sheila Velez is a freelance journalist and author of the “Lubanga Chronicles” which document the ICC trial.

via allAfrica.com: Congo-Kinshasa: Lubanga Trial Highlights Plight of Child Soldiers.

After reading Peter Eichstaedt: Another year for Kony and the LRA. its just confirmed what i thought to be true about Kony and the Khartoum (possibly) helping him. I said to a few people that if Kony made it to Darfur and was able to regroup the atrocities committed would be explosive.

In recent days reports have been coming through of captures and killings of LRA Rebel forces, but yet Kony still remains at large.  This one man seems to be capable of eluding forces time and time again.

The re-grouping of child soldiers is a violent act and against all human rights. these children are blackmailed, brainwashed and forced to commit atrocities. We need to do more to raise awareness for the plight of all child soldiers.

Through Invisible children over 200 US Congress have co-sponsored the LRA Disarmament and Northern Ugandan Recovery Act 2009, this is campaigning its way to the white house as we speak and they require the help of all the push this bill through. Visit Invisible childrenand check out how you can help end the longest running war in africa.

With the vast improvements in technology these days it is our duty to help those who are less fortunate. Current numbers say only around 5% of northern Uganda has electricity. To live in this century and not have access to electricity, fresh water, medical health and most of all food is atrocious. While westerners throw out tonnes of food each year to waste, over 1 billion* people are going hungry (*via WFP).

I find it hard these days to waste and i refuse to live as though we “have it all” when others have nothing. Poverty is so severe in some places lika Africa, Indonesia, Cambodia and many more, and when i see the amount of waste in my country (australia) it really hits home just how “self centred” our lives have become.

This year i am dedicating some more of my time to be more actively involved in my local community for those less fortunate as well as those abroad in other countries such as Uganda, Congo, Sudan and the like.

People ask me why i centre on Africa and its quite simply because i feel we need to take responsibility for colonilisation of africa. Alot of the issues going on there, all stem back to this time when white man entered and “took over” their countries, pitted northerner’s against southerner’s etc and thus come civil wars and rebel groups, corruption and more. Also, so much goes on in africa it gets very time consuming to spread the area to a vast local (not enough reading time with 3 young children).  A good clip to watch on the colonolisation of Africa is HERE

Each day i read reports of news from all over the world and im determined to make 2010 a year of change for myself, my family, local community and global community, i hope that others can do the same, only with all of us doing this together can we acheive the change we need for the world to survive.

*FreeUganda – Rebecca Fowler

The stealth boat belonging to anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd, Ady Gil, has reportedly been cut in half by a Japanese security vessel in the Antarctic.

Captain Watson told The Age online the $1.5 milliion high tech vessel’s remains were sinking. It’s six man crew had been rescued and was uninjured.

He said the Ady Gil was idling in waters near Commonwealth Bay when it was suddenly approached and rammed by the Japanese ship Shonan Maru, which has been detailed to provide security to the fleet.

Earlier today the fleet was contacted for the first time by the Ady Gil, and Sea Shepherd’s surprise third vessel, the Bob Barker.

Captain Watson, aboard the Steve Irwin, said he was still 500 miles from the scene.

“This seriously escalates the whole situation,” Captain Watson said of the collision.

“According to the Institute of Cetacean Research, the Ady Gil’s crew were launching projectiles at the Nisshin Maru, and attempted to entangle its propellors with rope.”

The biodiesel-powered trimaran Ady Gil had arrived at the Southern Ocean stand-off between Japanese whalers and activists yesterday, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

It was reported this morning to be about 50 nautical miles away from the whaling fleet.

Japan’s Fisheries Minister Hirotaka Akamatsu had earlier warned two security ships would be used to protect the whaling fleet, intervening when Sea Shepherd tried to block the transfer of harpooned whales to the factory ship Nisshin Maru.

Captain Watson this morning announced the existence of a secret third ship in the Sea Shepherd flotilla.

He said he was confident that with three ships, Sea Shepherd would be able to cause maximum disruption to the whaling, which has been underway for around a month.

The Rudd Government has repeatedly called for caution by both sides in the wilds of the Antarctic.

“We have reminded the masters of protest vessels of their obligations under international law to take all steps to ensure safety of life at sea, particularly in the inhospitable conditions of the Southern Ocean,” Environment Minister Peter Garrett told the SMH recently.

“We are also passing the same message to the government of Japan.”

via Anti-whaling ship ‘cut in half’ – Story – National – 3 News.

As reported on IRIN News: NAIROBI, 4 January 2010 (IRIN) – Thousands of families have fled Somalia’s central town of Dusamareb, the regional capital of Galgadud, after a weekend of fighting between Islamist groups killed dozens and left many others injured, locals told IRIN.

On 2 January, Al-Shabab attacked Dusamareb, 500km north of the capital Mogadishu, and captured it from Ahlu Sunna Waljama’a – a traditional Sufi group – for a short while before being forced out again.

“Our estimate is that between 6,000 and 7,000 families [32,000 to 42,000 people] have fled and are now displaced,” Sheikh Abdirahman Gedoqorow, a religious leader, told IRIN on 4 January.

Most of the displaced are scattered across rural villages and towns in the region, he said.

Gedoqorow said those displaced were facing difficult conditions due to insufficient assistance in the areas to which they had fled. “There is no one out there helping them and the area has been ravaged by drought.”

He said the displaced “desperately” needed shelter material, food and water, the most urgent requirement.

Rising death toll

A local leader estimated that 50 people had so far died in the fighting and at least 80 had been injured. However, a journalist, who requested anonymity, said the death toll was likely to be higher.

“The majority of those who died were from the invading [Al-Shabab] group,” the journalist said.

The two groups have been battling for control of the country’s central regions since Ahlu Sunna Waljama’a routed Al-Shabab from the area in December 2008.

The journalist added that Al-Shabab had since been reported to have left the area. “They are nowhere near Dusamareb. They took a beating on Saturday [2 January].”

Dusamareb, a town of about 40,000, has in the past three years hosted thousands of displaced people from Mogadishu. “Whether residents or IDPs, almost 80 percent are now displaced,” the journalist added.

Read the full report via IRIN Africa | SOMALIA: Thousands displaced by clashes in Galgadud | Horn of Africa | Somalia | Conflict Refugees/IDPs | News Item.

A New Zealand public relations guru is said to have paid for Japanese spy planes which have been keeping an eye on anti-whaling protesters in the Southern Ocean.

Reports say Glenn Inwood’s Omeka Public Relations company, which works for Japan’s Institute of Cetacean Research, chartered planes in Hobart and Albany to track the Sea Shepherd’s ship, the Steve Irwin, in December.

Sea Shepherd founder and Steve Irwin captain Paul Watson claims Mr Inwood put the “spy flights” on his credit card.

“The Japanese are spending an incredible amount of money this year. They’ve dedicated two vessels just to tail us and the latest flights out of Melbourne and Hobart cost them about $20,000,” he told the ABC.

“These surveillance flights are aiding an illegal operation and they should be stopped,” Mr Watson said.

“Japanese whaling is illegal – it’s a poaching operation.

“The Australian Government recognises it as illegal. They are taking whales in the Australian-Antarctic territory and they are in contempt of an Australian Federal Court order.”

The ABC attempted to contact Mr Inwood without success.

Read the full report here via PR guru ‘paid for whalers’ spy flights’ – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

Another whaling ship arrived in the Southern Ocean today, unexpected and right on time: the Bob Barker.

The 1,200-ton Norwegian built Antarctic harpoon vessel caught up with the Japanese whaling fleet at 0300 Hours on Wednesday, January 6th, in the area of Commonwealth Bay off the Adelie Coast at 143 Degrees 17 Minutes East and 66 Degrees 43 Minutes South. The Norwegian flag cracked in the chill Antarctic air as the silhouette of the whaler gave every indication that the ship was sent to support the Japanese whalers.

The Japanese could be forgiven for thinking that the pro-whaling Norwegians had sent a ship to support their illegal whaling activities in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary. But any excitement turned to disappointment quickly as the Norwegian flag was hauled down and the black and white skull with crossed Trident and Shepherd’s crook was raised to announce the arrival of the Bob Barker, the latest ship acquired for the Sea Shepherd ocean defense fleet.

Thanks to a $5,000,000 contribution from American television personality and icon Bob Barker, the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society was able to quietly purchase and refit the former Norwegian whaler in Africa. The ice strengthened fast chaser boat quietly departed from Mauritius on December 18th to join up with the Sea Shepherd ships Steve Irwin and Ady Gil in the Southern Ocean.

Barker has also funded the cost of a helicopter that will accompany the society’s ships. The aircraft is named The Nancy Burnet after the president of United Activists for Animal Rights, an organization Barker also supports. This new helicopter will participate in future campaigns.

Read the full report here via The Time is Right for Bob Barker to Rescue the Whales – Sea Shepherd.


About This List
Animal ingredients and their alternatives helps consumers avoid animal ingredients in food, cosmetics, and other products. Please note that it is not all-inclusive as there are thousands of technical and patented names for ingredient variations. Furthermore, many ingredients known by one name can be of animal, vegetable, or synthetic origin. If you have a question regarding an ingredient in a product, call the manufacturer. Good sources of additional information are the Consumer’s Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients, the Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives, or an unabridged dictionary. All of these are available at most libraries.
Adrenaline – Hormone from adrenal glands of hogs, cattle, and sheep. In medicine. Alternatives: synthetics.Alanine – See Amino Acids.

Albumen – In eggs, milk, muscles, blood, and many vegetable tissues and fluids. In cosmetics, albumen is usually derived from egg whites and used as a coagulating agent. May cause allergic reaction. In cakes, cookies, candies, etc. Egg whites sometimes used in “clearing” wines. Derivative: Albumin.

Albumin – See Albumen.

Alcloxa – See Allantoin.

Aldioxa – See Allantoin.

Aliphatic Alcohol – See Lanolin and Vitamin A.

Allantoin – Uric acid from cows, most mammals. Also in many plants (especially comfrey). In cosmetics (especially creams and lotions) and used in treatment of wounds and ulcers. Derivatives: Alcloxa, Aldioxa. Alternatives: extract of comfrey root, synthetics.

Alligator Skin – See Leather.

Alpha-Hydroxy Acids – Any one of several acids used as an exfoliant and in anti-wrinkle products. Lactic acid may be animal-derived (see Lactic Acid). Alternatives: glycolic acid, citric acid, and salicylic acid are plant- or fruit-derived.

Ambergris – From whale intestines. Used as a fixative in making perfumes and as a flavoring in foods and beverages. Alternatives: synthetic or vegetable fixatives.

Amino Acids – The building blocks of protein in all animals and plants. In cosmetics, vitamins, supplements, shampoos, etc. Alternatives: synthetics, plant sources.

Aminosuccinate Acid – See Aspartic Acid.

Angora – Hair from the Angora rabbit or goat. Used in clothing. Alternatives: synthetic fibers.

Animal Fats and Oils – In foods, cosmetics, etc. Highly allergenic. Alternatives: olive oil, wheat germ oil, coconut oil, flaxseed oil, almond oil, safflower oil, etc.

Animal Hair – In some blankets, mattresses, brushes, furniture, etc. Alternatives: vegetable and synthetic fibers.

Arachidonic Acid – A liquid unsaturated fatty acid that is found in liver, brain, glands, and fat of animals and humans. Generally isolated from animal liver. Used in companion animal food for nutrition and in skin creams and lotions to soothe eczema and rashes. Alternatives: synthetics, aloe vera, tea tree oil, calendula ointment.

Arachidyl Proprionate – A wax that can be from animal fat. Alternatives: peanut or vegetable oil.

Aspartic Acid. Aminosuccinate Acid – Can be animal or plant source (e.g., molasses). Sometimes synthesized for commercial purposes.

Bee Pollen – Microsporic grains in seed plants gathered by bees then collected from the legs of bees. Causes allergic reactions in some people. In nutritional supplements, shampoos, toothpastes, deodorants. Alternatives: synthetics, plant amino acids, pollen collected from plants.

Bee Products – Produced by bees for their own use. Bees are selectively bred. Culled bees are killed. A cheap sugar is substituted for their stolen honey. Millions die as a result. Their legs are often torn off by pollen collection trap doors.

Beeswax/Honeycomb – Wax obtained from melting honeycomb with boiling water, straining it, and cooling it. From virgin bees. Very cheap and widely used. May be harmful to the skin. In lipsticks and many other cosmetics (especially face creams, lotions, mascara, eye creams and shadows, face makeups, nail whiteners, lip balms, etc.). Derivatives: Cera Flava. Alternatives: paraffin, vegetable oils and fats. Ceresin, aka ceresine, aka earth wax. (Made from the mineral ozokerite. Replaces beeswax in cosmetics. Also used to wax paper, to make polishing cloths, in dentistry for taking wax impressions, and in candle-making.) Also, carnauba wax (from the Brazilian palm tree; used in many cosmetics, including lipstick; rarely causes allergic reactions). Candelilla wax (from candelilla plants; used in many cosmetics, including lipstick; also in the manufacture of rubber and phonograph records, in waterproofing and writing inks; no known toxicity). Japan wax (Vegetable wax. Japan tallow. Fat from the fruit of a tree grown in Japan and China.).

Benzoic Acid – In almost all vertebrates and in berries. Used as a preservative in mouthwashes, deodorants, creams, aftershave lotions, etc. Alternatives: cranberries, gum benzoin (tincture) from the aromatic balsamic resin from trees grown in China, Sumatra, Thailand, and Cambodia.

Beta Carotene – See Carotene.

Biotin/Vitamin H/Vitamin B Factor – In every living cell and in larger amounts in milk and yeast. Used as a texturizer in cosmetics, shampoos, and creams. Alternatives: plant sources.

Blood – From any slaughtered animal. Used as adhesive in plywood, also found in cheese-making, foam rubber, intravenous feedings, and medicines. Possibly in foods such as lecithin. Alternatives: synthetics, plant sources.

Boar Bristles – Hair from wild or captive hogs. In “natural” toothbrushes and bath and shaving brushes. Alternatives: vegetable fibers, nylon, the peelu branch or peelu gum (Asian, available in the U.S.; its juice replaces toothpaste).

Bone Char – Animal bone ash. Used in bone china and often to make sugar white. Serves as the charcoal used in aquarium filters. Alternatives: synthetic tribasic calcium phosphate.

Bone Meal – Crushed or ground animal bones. In some fertilizers. In some vitamins and supplements as a source of calcium. In toothpastes. Alternatives: plant mulch, vegetable compost, dolomite, clay, vegetarian vitamins.

Calciferol – See Vitamin D.

Calfskin – See Leather

Caprylamine Oxide – See Caprylic Acid.

Capryl Betaine – See Caprylic Acid.

Caprylic Acid – A liquid fatty acid from cow’s or goat’s milk. Also from palm and coconut oil, other plant oils. In perfumes, soaps. Derivatives: Caprylic Triglyceride, Caprylamine Oxide, Capryl Betaine. Alternatives: plant sources.

Caprylic Triglyceride – See Caprylic Acid.

Carbamide – See Urea.

Carmine/Cochineal/Carminic Acid – Red pigment from the crushed female cochineal insect. Reportedly, 70,000 beetles must be killed to produce one pound of this red dye. Used in cosmetics, shampoos, red apple sauce, and other foods (including red lollipops and food coloring). May cause allergic reaction. Alternatives: beet juice (used in powders, rouges, shampoos; no known toxicity); alkanet root (from the root of this herb-like tree; used as a red dye for inks, wines, lip balms, etc.; no known toxicity. Can also be combined to make a copper or blue coloring). (See Colors.)

Carminic Acid – See Carmine.

Carotene/Provitamin A/ Beta Carotene – A pigment found in many animal tissues and in all plants. Used as a coloring in cosmetics and in the manufacture of vitamin A.

Casein/Caseinate/Sodium Caseinate – Milk protein. In “non-dairy” creamers, soy cheese, many cosmetics, hair preparations, beauty masks. Alternatives: soy protein, soy milk, and other vegetable milks.

Caseinate – See Casein.

Cashmere – Wool from the Kashmir goat. Used in clothing. Alternatives: synthetic fibers.

Castor/Castoreum – Creamy substance with strong odor from muskrat and beaver genitals. Used as a fixative in perfume and incense. Alternatives: synthetics, plant castor oil.

Castoreum – See Castor.

Catgut – Tough string from the intestines of sheep, horses, etc. Used for surgical sutures. Also for stringing tennis rackets and musical instruments, etc. Alternatives: nylon and other synthetic fibers.

Cera Flava – See Beeswax.

Cerebrosides – Fatty acids and sugars found in the covering of nerves. May include tissue from brain.

Cetyl Alcohol – Wax found in spermaceti from sperm whales or dolphins. Alternatives: Vegetable cetyl alcohol (e.g., coconut), synthetic spermaceti.

Cetyl Palmitate – See Spermaceti.

Chitosan – A fiber derived from crustacean shells. Used as a lipid binder in diet products, in hair, oral and skin care products, antiperspirants, and deodorants. Alternatives: raspberries, yams, legumes, dried apricots, and many other fruits and vegetables.

Cholesterin – See Lanolin.

Cholesterol – A steroid alcohol in all animal fats and oils, nervous tissue, egg yolk, and blood. Can be derived from lanolin. In cosmetics, eye creams, shampoos, etc. Alternatives: solid complex alcohols (sterols) from plant sources.

Choline Bitartrate – See Lecithin.

Civet – Unctuous secretion painfully scraped from a gland very near the genital organs of civet cats. Used as a fixative in perfumes. Alternatives: (See alternatives to Musk.).

Cochineal – See Carmine.

Cod Liver Oil – See Marine Oil.

Collagen – Fibrous protein in vertebrates. Usually derived from animal tissue. Can’t affect the skin’s own collagen. An allergen. Alternatives: soy protein, almond oil, amla oil (see alternative to Keratin), etc.

Colors/Dyes – Pigments from animal, plant, and synthetic sources used to color foods, cosmetics, and other products. Cochineal is from insects. Widely used FD&C and D&C colors are coaltar (bituminous coal) derivatives that are continously tested on animals due to their carcinogenic properties. Alternatives: grapes, beets, turmeric, saffron, carrots, chlorophyll, annatto, alkanet.

Corticosteroid – See Cortisone.

Cortisone – Hormone from adrenal glands. Widely used in medicine. Alternatives: synthetics.

Cysteine/L-Form – An amino acid from hair which can come from animals. Used in hair-care products and creams, in some bakery products, and in wound-healing formulations. Alternatives: plant sources.

Cystine – An amino acid found in urine and horsehair. Used as a nutritional supplement and in emollients. Alternatives: plant sources.

Dexpanthenol – See Panthenol.

Diglycerides – See Monoglycerides and Glycerin.

Dimethyl Stearamine – See Stearic Acid.

Down – Goose or duck insulating feathers. From slaughtered or cruelly exploited geese. Used as an insulator in quilts, parkas, sleeping bags, pillows, etc. Alternatives: polyester and synthetic substitutes, kapok (silky fibers from the seeds of some tropical trees) and milkweed seed pod fibers.

Duodenum Substances – From the digestive tracts of cows and pigs. Added to some vitamin tablets. In some medicines. Alternatives: vegetarian vitamins, synthetics.

Dyes – See Colors.

Egg Protein – In shampoos, skin preparations, etc. Alternatives: plant proteins.

Elastin – Protein found in the neck ligaments and aortas of cows. Similar to collagen. Can’t affect the skin’s own elasticity. Alternatives: synthetics, protein from plant tissues.

Emu Oil – From flightless ratite birds native to Australia and now factory farmed. Used in cosmetics and creams. Alternatives: vegetable and plant oils.

Ergocalciferol – See Vitamin D.

Ergosterol – See Vitamin D.

Estradiol – See Estrogen.

Estrogen/Estradiol – Female hormones from pregnant mares urine. Considered a drug. Can have harmful systemic effects if used by children. Used for reproductive problems and in birth control pills and Premarin, a menopausal drug. In creams, perfumes, and lotions. Has a negligible effect in the creams as a skin restorative; simple vegetable-source emollients are considered better. Alternatives: oral contraceptives and menopausal drugs based on synthetic steroids or phytoestrogens (from plants, especially palm-kernel oil). Menopausal symptoms can also be treated with diet and herbs.

Fats – See Animal Fats.

Fatty Acids – Can be one or any mixture of liquid and solid acids such as caprylic, lauric, myristic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic. Used in bubble baths, lipsticks, soap, detergents, cosmetics, food. Alternatives: vegetable-derived acids, soy lecithin, safflower oil, bitter almond oil, sunflower oil, etc.

FD&C Colors – See Colors.

Feathers – From exploited and slaughtered birds. Used whole as ornaments or ground up in shampoos. (See Down and Keratin.)

Fish Liver Oil – Used in vitamins and supplements. In milk fortified with vitamin D. Alternatives: yeast extract ergosterol and exposure of skin to sunshine.

Fish Oil – Fish oil can also be from marine mammals. Used in soap-making. See also Marine Oil.

Fish Scales – Used in shimmery makeups. Alternatives: mica, rayon, synthetic pearl.

Fur – Obtained from animals , usually mink, foxes, or rabbits, cruelly trapped in steel-jaw leghold traps or raised in intensive confinement on fur “farms.” Alternatives: synthetics. See also Sable Brushes.

Gel – See Gelatin.

Gelatin/Gel – Protein obtained by boiling skin, tendons, ligaments, and/or bones with water. From cows and pigs. Used in shampoos, face masks, and other cosmetics. Used as a thickener for fruit gelatins and puddings (e.g., “Jello”). In candies, marshmallows, cakes, ice cream, yogurts. On photographic film and in vitamins as a coating and as capsules. Sometimes used to assist in “clearing” wines. Alternatives: carrageen (carrageenan, Irish moss), seaweeds (algin, agar-agar, kelp—used in jellies, plastics, medicine), pectin from fruits, dextrins, locust bean gum, cotton gum, silica gel. Marshmallows were originally made from the root of the marsh mallow plant. Vegetarian capsules are now available from several companies. Digital cameras don’t use film.

Glucose Tyrosinase – See Tyrosine.

Glycerides – See Glycerin.

Glycerin/Glycerol – A byproduct of soap manufacture (normally uses animal fat). In cosmetics, foods, mouthwashes, chewing gum, toothpastes, soaps, ointments, medicines, lubricants, transmission and brake fluid, and plastics. Derivatives: Glycerides, Glyceryls, Glycreth-26, Polyglycerol. Alternatives: vegetable glycerin—a byproduct of vegetable oil soap. Derivatives of seaweed, petroleum.

Glycerol – See Glycerin.

Glyceryls – See Glycerin.

Glycreth-26 – See Glycerin.

Guanine/Pearl Essence – Obtained from scales of fish. Constituent of ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid and found in all animal and plant tissues. In shampoo, nail polish, other cosmetics. Alternatives: leguminous plants, synthetic pearl, or aluminum and bronze particles.

Hide Glue – Same as gelatin but of a cruder impure form. Alternatives: dextrins and synthetic petrochemical-based adhesives. (See Gelatin.)

Honey – Food for bees, made by bees. Can cause allergic reactions. Used as a coloring and an emollient in cosmetics and as a flavoring in foods. Should never be fed to infants. Alternatives: in foods—maple syrup, date sugar, syrups made from grains such as barley malt, turbinado sugar, molasses; in cosmetics—vegetable colors and oils.

Honeycomb – See Beeswax.

Horsehair – See Animal Hair.

Hyaluronic Acid – A protein found in umbilical cords and the fluids around the joints. Used in cosmetics. Alternatives: synthetic hyaluronic acid, plant oils.

Hydrocortisone – See Cortisone.

Hydrolyzed Animal Protein – In cosmetics, especially shampoo and hair treatments. Alternatives: soy protein, other vegetable proteins, amla oil (see alternatives to Keratin).

Imidazolidinyl Urea – See Urea.

Insulin – From hog pancreas. Used by millions of diabetics daily. Alternatives: synthetics, vegetarian diet and nutritional supplements, human insulin grown in a lab.

Isinglass – A form of gelatin prepared from the internal membranes of fish bladders. Sometimes used in “clearing” wines and in foods. Alternatives: bentonite clay, “Japanese isinglass,” agar-agar (see alternatives to Gelatin), mica, a mineral used in cosmetics.

Isopropyl Lanolate – See Lanolin.

Isopropyl Myristate – See Myristic Acid.

Isopropyl Palmitate – Complex mixtures of isomers of stearic acid and palmitic acid. (See Stearic Acid.)

Keratin – Protein from the ground-up horns, hooves, feathers, quills, and hair of various animals. In hair rinses, shampoos, permanent wave solutions. Alternatives: almond oil, soy protein, amla oil (from the fruit of an Indian tree), human hair from salons. Rosemary and nettle give body and strand strength to hair.

Lactic Acid – Found in blood and muscle tissue. Also in sour milk, beer, sauerkraut, pickles, and other food products made by bacterial fermentation. Used in skin fresheners, as a preservative, in the formation of plasticizers, etc. Alternative: plant milk sugars, synthetics.

Lactose – Milk sugar from milk of mammals. In eye lotions, foods, tablets, cosmetics, baked goods, medicines. Alternatives: plant milk sugars.

Laneth – See Lanolin.

Lanogene – See Lanolin.

Lanolin/Lanolin Acids/Wool Fat/Wool Wax – A product of the oil glands of sheep, extracted from their wool. Used as an emollient in many skin care products and cosmetics and in medicines. An allergen with no proven effectiveness. (See Wool for cruelty to sheep.) Derivatives: Aliphatic Alcohols, Cholesterin, Isopropyl Lanolate, Laneth, Lanogene, Lanolin Alcohols, Lanosterols, Sterols, Triterpene Alcohols. Alternatives: plant and vegetable oils.

Lanolin Alcohol – See Lanolin.

Lanosterols – See Lanolin.

Lard – Fat from hog abdomens. In shaving creams, soaps, cosmetics. In baked goods, French fries, refried beans, and many other foods. Alternatives: pure vegetable fats or oils.

Leather/Suede/Calfskin/Sheepskin/Alligator Skin/Other Types of Skin – Subsidizes the meat industry. Used to make wallets, handbags, furniture and car upholstery, shoes, etc. Alternatives: cotton, canvas, nylon, vinyl, ultrasuede, pleather, other synthetics.

Lecithin/Choline Bitartrate – Waxy substance in nervous tissue of all living organisms. But frequently obtained for commercial purposes from eggs and soybeans. Also from nerve tissue, blood, milk, corn. Choline bitartrate, the basic constituent of lecithin, is in many animal and plant tissues and prepared synthetically. Lecithin can be in eye creams, lipsticks, liquid powders, hand creams, lotions, soaps, shampoos, other cosmetics, and some medicines. Alternatives: soybean lecithin, synthetics.

Linoleic Acid – An essential fatty acid. Used in cosmetics, vitamins. Alternatives: (See alternatives to Fatty Acids.)

Lipase – Enzyme from the stomachs and tongue glands of calves, kids, and lambs. Used in cheese-making and in digestive aids. Alternatives: vegetable enzymes, castor beans.

Lipids – See Lipoids.

Lipoids/Lipids – Fat and fat-like substances that are found in animals and plants. Alternatives: vegetable oils.

Marine Oil – From fish or marine mammals (including porpoises). Used in soap-making. Used as a shortening (especially in some margarines), as a lubricant, and in paint. Alternatives: vegetable oils.

Methionine – Essential amino acid found in various proteins (usually from egg albumen and casein). Used as a texturizer and for freshness in potato chips. Alternatives: synthetics.

Milk Protein – Hydrolyzed milk protein. From the milk of cows. In cosmetics, shampoos, moisturizers, conditioners, etc. Alternatives: soy protein, other plant proteins.

Mink Oil – From minks. In cosmetics, creams, etc. Alternatives: vegetable oils and emollients such as avocado oil, almond oil, and jojoba oil.

Monoglycerides/Glycerides – From animal fat. In margarines, cake mixes, candies, foods, etc. In cosmetics. Alternative: vegetable glycerides. See also Glycerin.

Musk (Oil) – Dried secretion painfully obtained from musk deer, beaver, muskrat, civet cat, and otter genitals. Wild cats are kept captive in cages in horrible conditions and are whipped around the genitals to produce the scent; beavers are trapped; deer are shot. In perfumes and in food flavorings. Alternatives: labdanum oil (which comes from various rockrose shrubs) and other plants with a musky scent. Labdanum oil has no known

Myristal Ether Sulfate – See Myristic Acid.

Myristic Acid – Organic acid in most animal and vegetable fats. In butter acids. Used in shampoos, creams, cosmetics. In food flavorings. Derivatives: Isopropyl Myristate, Myristal Ether Sulfate, Myristyls, Oleyl Myristate. Alternatives: nut butters, oil of lovage, coconut oil, extract from seed kernels of nutmeg, etc.

Myristyls – See Myristic Acid.

“Natural Sources” – Can mean animal or vegetable sources. Most often in the health food industry, especially in the cosmetics area, it means animal sources, such as animal elastin, glands, fat, protein, and oil. Alternatives: plant sources.

Nucleic Acids – In the nucleus of all living cells. Used in cosmetics, shampoos, conditioners, etc. Also in vitamins, supplements. Alternatives: plant sources.

Ocenol – See Oleyl Alcohol.

Octyl Dodecanol – Mixture of solid waxy alcohols. Primarily from stearyl alcohol. (See Stearyl Alcohol.)

Oleic Acid – Obtained from various animal and vegetable fats and oils. Usually obtained commercially from inedible tallow. (See Tallow.) In foods, soft soap, bar soap, permanent wave solutions, creams, nail polish, lipsticks, many other skin preparations. Derivatives: Oleyl Oleate, Oleyl Stearate. Alternatives: coconut oil. (See alternatives to Animal Fats and Oils.)

Oils – See alternatives to Animal Fats and Oils.

Oleths – See Oleyl Alcohol.

Oleyl Alcohol/Ocenol – Found in fish oils. Used in the manufacture of detergents, as a plasticizer for softening fabrics, and as a carrier for medications. Derivatives: Oleths, Oleyl Arachidate, Oleyl Imidazoline.

Oleyl Arachidate – See Oleyl Alcohol.

Oleyl Imidazoline – See Oleyl Alcohol.

Oleyl Myristate – See Myristic Acid.

Oleyl Oleate – See Oleic Acid.

Oleyl Stearate – See Oleic Acid.

Palmitamide – See Palmitic Acid.

Palmitamine – See Palmitic Acid.

Palmitate – See Palmitic Acid.

Palmitic Acid – From fats, oils. Mixed with stearic acid. Found in many animal fats and plant oils. In shampoos, shaving soaps, creams. Derivatives: Palmitate, Palmitamine, Palmitamide. Alternatives: palm oil, vegetable sources. See also Fatty Acids.

Panthenol/Dexpanthenol/Vitamin B-Complex Factor/Provitamin B-5 – Can come from animal or plant sources or synthetics. In shampoos, supplements, emollients, etc. In foods. Derivative: Panthenyl. Alternatives: synthetics, plants.

Panthenyl – See Panthenol.

Pepsin – Obtainrd from hogs’ stomachs. A clotting agent. In some cheeses and vitamins. Same uses and alternatives as Rennet.

Placenta/Placenta Polypeptides Protein/Afterbirth – Contains waste matter eliminated by the fetus. Derived from the uterus of slaughtered animals. Animal placenta is widely used in skin creams, shampoos, masks, etc. Alternatives: kelp. See also alternatives to Animal Fats and Oils.

Polyglycerol – See Glycerin.

Polypeptides – From animal protein. Used in cosmetics. Alternatives: plant proteins and enzymes.

Polysorbates – Derivatives of fatty acids. In cosmetics, foods.

Pristane – Obtained from the liver oil of sharks and from whale ambergris. Used as a lubricant and anti-corrosive agent. In cosmetics. Alternatives: plant oils, synthetics. See Squalene, Ambergris.

Progesterone – A steroid hormone used in anti-wrinkle face creams. Can have adverse systemic effects. Alternatives: synthetics.

Propolis – Tree sap gathered by bees and used as a sealant in beehives. In toothpaste, shampoo, deodorant, supplements, etc. Alternatives: tree sap, synthetics.

Provitamin A – See Carotene.

Provitamin B-5 – See Panthenol.

Provitamin D-2 – See Vitamin D.

Rennet/Rennin – Enzyme from calves’ stomachs. Used in cheese-making, rennet custard (junket), and in many coagulated dairy products. Alternatives: microbial coagulating agents, bacteria culture, lemon juice, or vegetable rennet.

Rennin – See Rennet.

Resinous Glaze – See Shellac.

Ribonucleic Acid – See RNA.

RNA/Ribonucleic Acid – RNA is in all living cells. Used in many protein shampoos and cosmetics. Alternatives: plant cells.

Royal Jelly – Secretion from the throat glands of the honeybee workers that is fed to the larvae in a colony and to all queen larvae. No proven value in cosmetics preparations. Alternatives: aloe vera, comfrey, other plant derivatives.

Sable Brushes – From the fur of sables (weasel-like mammals). Used to make eye makeup, lipstick, and artists’ brushes. Alternatives: synthetic fibers.

Sea Turtle Oil – See Turtle Oil.

Shark Liver Oil – Oil from shark livers, etc. In cosmetics, moisturizers, hair dyes, surface-active agents. Used in lubricating creams and lotions. Derivatives: Squalane, Squalene. Alternatives: vegetable oils. Alternatives: vegetable emollients such as olive oil, wheat germ oil, rice bran oil, etc.

Sheepskin – See Leather.

Shellac/Resinous Glaze – Resinous excretion of certain insects. Used as a candy glaze, in hair lacquer, and on jewelry. Alternatives: plant waxes.

Silk/Silk Powder – Silk is the shiny fiber made by silkworms to form their cocoons. Worms are boiled in their cocoons to get the silk. Used in cloth. In silk-screening other fine cloth can and is used instead. Taffeta can be made from silk or nylon. Silk powder is obtained from the secretion of the silkworm. It is used as a coloring agent in face powders, soaps, etc. Can cause severe allergic skin reactions and systemic reactions if inhaled or ingested. Alternatives: milkweed seed-pod fibers, nylon, silk-cotton tree and ceiba tree filaments (kapok), rayon, and synthetic silks.

Snails – In some cosmetics (crushed).

Sodium Caseinate – See Casein.

Sodium Steroyl Lactylate – See Lactic Acid.

Sodium Tallowate – See Tallow.

Spermaceti/Cetyl Palmitate/Sperm Oil – Waxy oil derived from the sperm whale’s head or from dolphins. In many margarines. In skin creams, ointments, shampoos, candles, etc. Used in the leather industry. May become rancid and cause irritations. Alternatives: synthetic spermaceti, jojoba oil, and other vegetable emollients.

Sponge (Luna and Sea) – A plant like animal that lives in the sea and is becoming scarce. Alternatives: synthetic sponges, loofahs (plants used as sponges).

Squalane – See Shark Liver Oil.

Stearamide – See Stearic Acid.

Stearamine – See Stearic Acid.

Stearamine Oxide – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearates – See Stearic Acid.

Stearic Acid – Fat from cows and sheep and from dogs and cats euthanized in animal shelters, etc. Most often refers to a fatty substance taken from the stomachs of pigs. Can be harsh, irritating. Used in cosmetics, soaps, lubricants, candles, hairspray, conditioners, deodorants, creams, chewing gum, food flavoring. Derivatives: Stearamide, Stearamine, Stearates, Stearic Hydrazide, Stearone, Stearoxytrimethylsilane, Stearoyl Lactylic Acid, Stearyl Betaine, Stearyl Imidazoline. Alternatives: Stearic acid can be found in many vegetable fats, coconut.

Stearic Hydrazide – See Stearic Acid.

Stearone – See Stearic Acid.

Stearoxytrimethylsilane – See Stearic Acid.

Stearoyl Lactylic Acid – See Stearic Acid.

Stearyl Acetate – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearyl Alcohol/Sterols – A mixture of solid alcohols. Can be prepared from sperm whale oil. In medicines, creams, rinses, shampoos, etc. Derivatives: Stearamine Oxide, Stearyl Acetate, Stearyl Caprylate, Stearyl Citrate, Stearyldimethyl Amine, Stearyl Glycyrrhetinate, Stearyl Heptanoate, Stearyl Octanoate, Stearyl Stearate. Alternatives: plant sources, vegetable stearic acid.

Stearyl Betaine – See Stearic Acid.

Stearyl Caprylate – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearyl Citrate – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearyldimethyl Amine – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearyl Glycyrrhetinate – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearyl Heptanoate – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearyl Imidazoline – See Stearic Acid.

Stearyl Octanoate – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Stearyl Stearate – See Stearyl Alcohol.

Steroids/Sterols – From various animal glands or from plant tissues. Steroids include sterols. Sterols are alcohol from animals or plants (e.g., cholesterol). Used in hormone preparation. In creams, lotions, hair conditioners, fragrances, etc. Alternatives: plant tissues, synthetics. See also Stearyl Alcohol.

Suede – See Leather.

Tallow/Tallow Fatty Alcohol/Stearic Acid – Rendered beef fat. May cause eczema and blackheads. In wax paper, crayons, margarines, paints, rubber, lubricants, etc. In candles, soaps, lipsticks, shaving creams, other cosmetics. Chemicals (e.g., PCB) can be in animal tallow. Derivatives: Sodium Tallowate, Tallow Acid, Tallow Amide, Tallow Amine, Talloweth-6, Tallow Glycerides, Tallow Imidazoline. Alternatives: vegetable tallow, Japan tallow, paraffin and/or ceresin (see alternatives to Beeswax for all three). Paraffin is usually from petroleum, wood, coal, or shale oil.

Tallow Acid – See Tallow.

Tallow Amide – See Tallow.

Tallow Amine – See Tallow.

Talloweth-6 – See Tallow.

Tallow Glycerides – See Tallow.

Tallow Imidazoline – See Tallow.

Triterpene Alcohols – See Lanolin.

Turtle Oil/Sea Turtle Oil – From the muscles and genitals of giant sea turtles. In soap, skin creams, nail creams, other cosmetics. Alternatives: vegetable emollients (see alternatives to Animal Fats and Oils).

Tyrosine – Amino acid hydrolyzed from casein. Used in cosmetics and creams. Derivative: Glucose Tyrosinase.

Urea/Carbamide – Excreted from urine and other bodily fluids. In deodorants, ammoniated dentifrices, mouthwashes, hair colorings, hand creams, lotions, shampoos, etc. Used to “brown” baked goods, such as pretzels. Derivatives: Imidazolidinyl Urea, Uric Acid. Alternatives: synthetics.

Uric Acid – See Urea.

Vitamin A – Can come from fish liver oil (e.g., shark liver oil), egg yolk, butter, lemongrass, wheat germ oil, carotene in carrots, and synthetics. It is an aliphatic alcohol. In cosmetics, creams, perfumes, hair dyes, etc. In vitamins, supplements. Alternatives: carrots, other vegetables, synthetics.

Vitamin B-Complex Factor – See Panthenol.

Vitamin B Factor – See Biotin.

Vitamin B-12 – Can come from animal products or bacteria cultures. Twinlab B-12 vitamins contain gelatin. Alternatives: Vegetarian vitamins, fortified soy milks, nutritional yeast, fortified meat substitutes. Vitamin B12 is often listed as “cyanocobalamin” on food labels. Vegan health professionals caution that vegans get vitamin B12 from fortified foods or supplements daily.

Vitamin D/Ergocalciferol/Vitamin D-2/Ergosterol/Provitamin D-2/Calciferol/Vitamin D-3 – Vitamin D can come from fish liver oil, milk, egg yolk, etc. Vitamin D-2 can come from animal fats or plant sterols. Vitamin D-3 is always from an animal source. All the D vitamins can be in creams, lotions, other cosmetics, vitamin tablets, etc. Alternatives: plant and mineral sources, synthetics, completely vegetarian vitamins, exposure of skin to sunshine. Many other vitamins can come from animal sources. Examples: choline, biotin, inositol, riboflavin, etc.

Vitamin H – See Biotin.

Wax – Glossy, hard substance that is soft when hot. From animals and plants. In lipsticks, depilatories, hair straighteners. Alternatives: vegetable waxes.

Whey – A serum from milk. Usually in cakes, cookies, candies, and breads. In cheese-making. Alternatives: soybean whey.

Wool – From sheep. Used in clothing. Ram lambs and old “wool” sheep are slaughtered for their meat. Sheep are transported without food or water, in extreme heat and cold. Legs are broken, eyes injured, etc. Sheep are bred to be unnaturally woolly, also unnaturally wrinkly, which causes them to get insect infestations around the tail areas. The farmer’s solution to this is the painful cutting away of the flesh around the tail (called ?mulesing?). “Inferior” sheep are killed. When shearing the sheep, they are pinned down violently and sheared roughly. Their skin is cut up. Every year, hundreds of thousands of shorn sheep die from exposure to cold. Natural predators of sheep (wolves, coyotes, eagles, etc.) are poisoned, trapped, and shot. In the U.S., overgrazing of cattle and sheep is turning more than 150 million acres of land to desert. “Natural” wool production uses enormous amounts of resources and energy (to breed, raise, feed, shear, transport, slaughter, etc., the sheep). Derivatives: Lanolin, Wool Wax, Wool Fat. Alternatives: cotton, cotton flannel, synthetic fibers, ramie, etc.

Wool Fat – See Lanolin.

Wool Wax – See Lanolin.

REFERENCES
Buyukmihci, Nermin. “John Cardillo’s List of Animal Products and Their Alternatives.”

Cosmetic Ingredients Glossary: A Basic Guide to Natural Body Care Products. Petaluma, Calif.: Feather River Co., 1988.

Mason, Jim, and Peter Singer. Animal Factories. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1980.

Ruesch, Hans. Slaughter of the Innocent. New York: Civitas, 1983.

Singer, Peter. Animal Liberation. New York: Random House, 1990.

Webster’s Third New International Dictionary. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webster Inc., 1981.
Winter, Ruth. A Consumer’s Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients. New York: Crown Publishing Group, 1994.
Winter, Ruth. A Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives. New York: Crown Publishing Group, 1994.

via Vegan Channel: Vegan products, resources, recipes, links for vegan, cruelty free lifestyle..

The Yushin Maru hauls in a captured whale

Planes tracked protesters: The Yushin Maru hauls in a captured whale (www.customs.gov.au)

The captain of an anti-whaling protest ship has backed reports that Japanese whalers have been chartering Australian planes to track the ship’s movements in the Southern Ocean.

Fairfax newspapers are reporting that a public relations company linked to Japan’s Institute of Cetacean Research chartered planes in Hobart and Albany to track the Sea Shepherd’s ship, the Steve Irwin, in December.

The Steve Irwin’s captain, Paul Watson, says he believes those on board the plane reported his ship’s position to a Japanese whale chasing boat.

“We did notice the plane in December; we thought it was an Australian Government plane so we didn’t take very much notice of it,” he said.

“But then six hours later the Japanese vessel Shonan Maru showed up and got on our tail and we couldn’t shake them for three weeks.”

Federal Opposition environment spokesman Greg Hunt says the Government should investigate the flights and put a stop to them.

“What we have here is spy flights, which are helping to breach international law, being conducted from Australian airports under the guise and under the nose of the Australian Government,” he said.

Read the full report via Whaling fleet’s ‘spy flights’ flew out of Australia – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

“Since becoming an activist, i have been heavily supportive of the Sea Shepherd Organization. what they are doing on the Front line to save the whales is nothing short of amazing. How on earth can anyone want to eat whale meat? ok it may taste yummy (as they reckon) but it just cant be justified. We DO NOT need to eat whale meat, nor do we need their oil for beauty or health products. We have advancements with technologies these days that can make synthetic strains and oils…replicate it and leave the whales alone. ” Rebecca Fowler

Authorities in Iran have banned contact with more than 60 international organisations including the BBC.

Authorities in Iran intensified their campaign to blame the country’s political turmoil on foreigners today by banning contact with more than 60 international organisations.

The intelligence ministry said the blacklist included thinktanks, universities and broadcasting organisations identified as waging a “soft war” aimed at toppling Iran’s Islamic system.

It forbade Iranians from talking to or receiving aid from the proscribed organisations, including the BBC, which last year launched a Farsi satellite television channel, as well as two US government-funded outlets, Voice of America and Radio Farda, both of which broadcast in Farsi.

Also on the list were Wilton Park, a British group that organises foreign policy conferences, Yale University and leading American thinktanks, including the Brookings Institution and the George Soros Open Society Foundation.

Read the full report via Iran bans contact with foreign organisations, including the BBC | World news | The Guardian.

“Just another way of being able to control the public of a country, but for how long will it last.  From what i have read and seen on this situation i seem to think its going to be a very violent ending to this situation.  The government have to realize that no amount of force will stop these protesters. They want their vote, they want their rightful president and like any country who didn’t get what they believed as the “rightful” winner, they will repent.  I send my prayers to the Iranians and family’s of the innocent victims so far, such a terrible tragedy in the face of yet another tyrant.” Rebecca Fowler (freeuganda)

YouTube – L’Esperance Orphanage.