Posts Tagged ‘Alaska’

The Extinction Protocol

June 2014ALASKA Another remote volcano in Alaska is showing signs of unrest or possible activity. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) sent out the following alert: “A swarm of earthquakes at Semisopochnoi volcano that started at 10:00 AKDT (18:00 UTC) on June 9 escalated yesterday, June 12, at approximately 12:00 AKDT (20:00 UTC). The continuation of this anomalous seismic activity through the night prompts AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code to YELLOW and the Volcano Alert Level to ADVISORY. No eruptive activity is currently indicated. AVO is closely monitoring the situation and will issue further updates as conditions change.”
“Semisopochnoi volcano is monitored by a 6-station seismic network as well as satellite imagery. Five of the seismic stations on Semisopochnoi are currently operational. The telemetry system for the Semisopochnoi stations, located on Amchitka Island, was just repaired in late May. Semisopochnoi Island is located 65 km (40…

View original post 29 more words

The Extinction Protocol

May 5, 2013ALASKAScientists say Alaska’s Cleveland Volcano is undergoing a continuous low-level eruption. The activity began with an explosion early Saturday morning, followed by two other explosions hours later. The Alaska Volcano Observatory and U.S. Geological Survey say satellites and cameras suggest low-level emissions of gas, steam and a small amount of ash. Satellites detected highly elevated surface temperatures at the summit. The Federal Aviation Administration said there are no flight restrictions as a result. The volcano in the Aleutian Islands is 940 miles southwest of Anchorage. Its most recent significant eruption began in February 2001 and featured three explosive events that sent ash clouds as high 39,000 feet above sea level. It also produced a rubbly lava flow and hot avalanche that reached the sea. –ABC News

View original post

The Extinction Protocol

August 31, 2012 ALASKAA series of small earthquakes which began Wednesday night and continued into Thursday near a long-dormant volcanic peak in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands has prompted researchers to raise the alert level for the Little Sitkin volcano. The nearly 4,000-foot-high Little Sitkin volcano is named for the island where it resides, located in the Rat Islands in the Aleutian chain. The volcano has shown little activity since scientists have started observing it, with only three questionable eruptive events at the volcano since that time. The most recent eruption may have come in 1900, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory. However, the Smithsonian Global Volcanism program documents the last eruption as 1830. Still, the AVO page for Little Sitkin mentions there may have been a “cataclysmic eruption” on the island sometime after the last ice age, which ended more than 11,000 years ago. Seismic equipment located near…

View original post 115 more words

The Extinction Protocol

August 11, 2012ALASKAA rare summer storm blasted the Arctic this week, beginning off the coast of Alaska, and moving over much of the Arctic Sea for several days before dissipating. Although the storm itself was uncommon — NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., estimates that there have only been about eight similarly strong August storms in the last 34 years — the real news behind the meteorological event is the stunning Aug. 6 photo taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. The cyclone is spinning toward the North Pole, with Greenland visible in the bottom-left of the image. Scientists are left speculating what the impact of such a storm could be. Arctic storms such as this one can have a large impact on the sea ice, causing it to melt rapidly through many mechanisms, such as tearing off large…

View original post 142 more words

The Extinction Protocol

August 10, 2012ALASKAA 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck along the Pacific tectonic plate boundary of the Fox and Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The epicenter of the earthquake was 1422 km (884 miles) SW (236°) from Anchorage, AK and occurred at a depth of 19 km (11 miles) below the ocean floor. Seismic unrest is growing along the Alaska region and it goes without saying Alaska is destined to be struck by much larger magnitude earthquakes. –The Extinction Protocol

View original post