Posts Tagged ‘Big Pharma’

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/greens-push-to-ban-drug-company-perks-for-doctors-20130118-2cyzm.html DRUG companies will no longer be able to pay for doctors to travel to conferences under new laws proposed by the Greens to get rid of a multimillion-dollar gravy train believed to be contaminating medical practice. As concern mounts about the influence of drug and medical device companies’ largesse on doctors, Greens health spokesman Richard Di Natale said he would introduce a bill to the Senate to clean up the pharmaceutical sector’s interaction with health professionals. The bill would ban payments for doctors to travel or attend education seminars and conferences domestically and overseas, as well as the sponsorship of educational meetings intended for Australian doctors overseas. It will also ban gifts and promotional items and require companies to report the names of health professionals and the fees they are receiving for services such as speeches or consulting. In Australia, drug companies are spending about $65 million a year on hosting doctors at more than 35,000 educational events and some believe it is polluting medical practice with commercial interests. Read the full report via smh















Truth11

November 28, 2012

View original post

Add your thoughts here… (optional)

Truth11

Paul Fassa

Prisonplanet.com
Sept 30, 2012

This is not alternative health conspiratorial conjecture. This has been officially recorded but barely reported. So here is a sampling of recorded disease breakouts among children who were vaccinated for that disease. Enforcing or increasing vaccine schedules does not really prevent disease; it only increases the chances of worse health or gravely critical adverse reactions, ranging from autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) to decreased immunity and increased poor health.

Some Known Outbreaks of Vaccinated Kids

The most recent outbreak occurred in California. The disease was whooping cough, or pertussis. The vaccination that has become a regularly scheduled pediatric ritual is a combination of three vaccines known as DTaP or DTP, which stands for Diptheria – Tetenus – acellular Pertussis.

This three-in-one vaccine cocktail is supposed to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis, or whooping cough. The pediatric vaccination schedule calls for administering this cocktail at two…

View original post 495 more words

Big Pharma shifting from deadly chemical drugs to bioelectric implants

Wednesday, August 08, 2012 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer

(NaturalNews) Not content simply drugging its millions of victims with mind-altering chemical and biological inputs, the pharmaceutical industry is now developing ways to literally transform the human brain into a drug industry-controlled, biometric computer that will basically turn human beings into nothing more than mind-controlled robots.

The Financial Times reports that GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), the drug behemoth recently forced to fork over the largest ever amount in fines for its massive criminal conduct (http://www.naturalnews.com), is leading the way in unveiling what the industry is now calling “bioelectronics.” The premise holds that certain diseases can be treated by injecting electronic devices within the body for the purpose of artificially controlling neuronal synapses and other activity.

“Moving beyond conventional drugs that interact biochemically with the body, [Big Pharma] will have built a big ‘bioelectronics’ business that treats disease through electrical signaling in the brain and elsewhere,” writes Clive Cookson for FT.com about the concept, which is expected to eventually replace many common drugs.

“Neurological problems, from stroke and epilepsy to depression, will be treated through electronic implants into the brain rather than pills or injections. Even diabetes and obesity will be attacked in ways that seem like science fiction today, by sending electrical signals to malfunctioning cells.”

Rather than help the body naturally heal itself through proper nutrition, cleansing, and lifestyle, bioelectronics basically bypasses the body’s own immune and healing systems, and replaces them with remote-controlled computer chips that can be programmed and monitored by outside forces. It is the embodiment of the “bionic man” or “cyborg” concept, where human beings are taken over by computers and mind-controlled.

Drug companies admit in plain sight their plans for mass mind control

Presented alongside glowing results from a few recent clinical trials showing how the technology can be used to potentially help tetraplegics and other seriously injured or paralyzed patients regain function, bioelectronics has the very real potential to be used for much more sinister purposes like controlling thought patterns — yes, researchers are already saying it can be used to treat “depression” — as well as individual eating habits and preferences.

Though the idea is still potentially years or even decades away from actually being commercialized, the stage is being set for its eventual widespread use. Experimental treatments, such as the battery-powered electrodes that were implanted into Edi Guyton’s brain tissue to cure her depression (http://www.cnn.com/2012/04/14/health/battery-powered-brain/index.html), are already being actualized in the name of modern medicine.

“Ultimately, [bioelectronics] treats people in a purely mechanical way, where subjective personal inputs that may not always be helpful are bypassed,” wrote one commenter in response to the FT.com piece. “How long before someone suggests serial criminals are fitted with bioelectrical patches that stymie endorphins and reduce the excitement associated with criminal behavior? Or perhaps release a toxin that makes the person ill if they feel stimulated in the ‘wrong way?'”

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ft.com

http://www.naturalnews.com/032088_mind_control_drugs.html

Fair Use Notice: This web site contains some copyrighted material whose use has not been authorized by the copyright owners. We believe that this not-for-profit, educational use on the Web constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Fair Use notwithstanding we will immediately comply with any copyright owner who wants their material removed or modified, wants us to link to their web site

by Michael Belkin
The Refusers

Merck is the company that makes Gardasil, MMR, Varivax (chickenpox) and other vaccines. Merck is the largest US vaccine manufacturer.

According to OSHA head David Michael’s excellent book Doubt is Their Product, Merck knew from their pre-release clinical studies that Vioxx had four times the risk of heart attack as the placebo they used (naproxen). They preposterously inverted that finding and spun it around to state that the placebo naproxen reduced heart attack risk by 80%. According to Michaels’ book, ‘scientists at the FDA estimate that Vioxx caused between 88,000 and 139,000 heart attacks, probably 30%-40% of them fatal.’

The midpoint of that range is 40,000. So Merck (with foreknowledge) deliberately killed about 40,000 people that were simply taking a pain reliever drug (most weren’t heart patients). That is almost as many deaths as US combat casualties in the Vietnam war. That must make Merck the biggest corporate mass-murderer in history. Where is the outrage? The public remains ignorant of Merck’s crime.

Take a close look at that deadly card trick with placebos. Merck and other vaccine manufacturers use a similar strategy with vaccine trials. Vaccine safety studies use other vaccines or aluminum adjuvants for placebos, not something neutral like saline solution. Vaccines and aluminum adjuvants cause neurological adverse reactions. If their new vaccine being tested causes the same amount of neurological reactions as an old vaccine or aluminum placebo, they call it ‘safe.’

In my opinion, Merck is following a Vioxx-style business strategy with Gardasil and other vaccines. They couldn’t care less how many people die or get permanently disabled from their pharmaceutical products. With drugs, multi-billion dollar settlements like this are built into the business plan. With vaccines Merck has zero liability because they are shielded by the sham US national vaccine injury compensation program.

People should wake up to the risk of prescription drugs and vaccines. Personally, I would boycott all Merck products because they are clearly an unethical company with zero integrity. If you don’t believe me, read David Michaels’ book Doubt is Their Product. David Michaels is an epidemiologist and is the US Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA).

************************************************************************************************

Merck to Pay $950 Million to Settle Government’s Vioxx Probe

Bloomberg Nov 22, 2011

By Jef Feeley, David Voreacos and Seth Stern

Merck & Co. (MRK), the second-largest U.S. drugmaker, will pay $950 million and a unit of the company will plead guilty to a criminal charge to resolve a federal probe of its sales of the painkiller Vioxx, the U.S. said.

Merck, Sharp & Dohme will plead guilty to a single violation of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, a misdemeanor, the U.S. Justice Department said today in a statement. The company will pay a $321.6 million criminal fine and $628.3 million for a civil settlement of allegations regarding so-called off-label marketing of the drug.

Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1999, Vioxx became Merck’s third largest-selling drug by 2003, generating $2.5 billion in annual sales. Merck, which pulled Vioxx off the market in 2004 after a study found it posed an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes, set aside $950 million in October 2010 to deal with the consequences from the criminal investigation.

The company, based in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, already has agreed to pay $4.85 billion to settle thousands of patient lawsuits claiming injuries, along with $1.9 billion for legal costs in defending and resolving the cases. The shares fell 32 cents to $33.82 at 2:58 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading.

The criminal plea stems from the misbranding of Vioxx for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis before regulators had approved that use, the U.S. said. The civil settlement covers inaccurate or misleading statements made by Merck about the cardiovascular safety of the drug.

Read the Article

Full Blog Post from Refusers: http://therefusers.com/refusers-newsroom/merck-pleads-guilty-to-criminal-charge-and-pays-950-million-fine-for-vioxx/

Fair Use Notice: This web site contains some copyrighted material whose use has not been authorized by the copyright owners. We believe that this not-for-profit, educational use on the Web constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Fair Use notwithstanding we will immediately comply with any copyright owner who wants their material removed or modified, wants us to link to their web site

US authorities have charged Pfizer and its subsidiary Wyeth with paying millions of dollars in bribes to build their business in Eastern Europe and China, and set hefty fines on the two to settle the charges. The Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission both said Pfizer subsidiaries paid off officials, doctors and healthcare professionals in Bulgaria, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Italy, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Serbia during 2001-2007 in violation of the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Employees of subsidiaries made the payoffs to secure approval and registration of Pfizer and Wyeth products, and obtain sales contracts for them, according to court filings and statements from the department and SEC. “Pfizer subsidiaries in several countries had bribery so entwined in their sales culture that they offered points and bonus programs to improperly reward foreign officials who proved to be their best customers,” said Kara Brockmeyer, head of the SEC’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Unit.

But the Justice Department and SEC said on Tuesday that Pfizer officials had not been aware of the payments, and were strongly cooperative with investigators, mitigating the need for criminal prosecution and heavy penalties.

Pfizer subsidiary Pfizer HCP agreed to pay a $US15 million ($A14.25 million) penalty to the department under a deferred prosecution agreement to resolve the investigation.

Pfizer will also pay the SEC $US26.3 million in forgone profits, while Wyeth, the drugmaker that Pfizer took over in 2009, will give up $US18.8 million in disgorged profits.

“Pfizer HCP received a reduction in its penalty as a result of Pfizer Inc’s cooperation in the ongoing investigation of other companies and individuals,” the Justice Department said.

“Corrupt pay-offs to foreign officials in order to secure lucrative contracts creates an inherently uneven marketplace and puts honest companies at a disadvantage,” said James McJunkin, assistant director of the Washington field office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

“Those that attempt to make these illegal backroom deals to influence contract procurement can expect to be investigated by the FBI and appropriately held responsible for their actions.”

As Originally Reported by the Herald Sun – Website Stated

Fair Use Notice: This web site contains some copyrighted material whose use has not been authorized by the copyright owners. We believe that this not-for-profit, educational use on the Web constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Fair Use notwithstanding we will immediately comply with any copyright owner who wants their material removed or modified, wants us to link to their web site

Glaxo Agrees to Pay $3 Billion in Fraud Settlement

By and
Published: July 2, 2012

In the largest settlement involving a pharmaceutical company, the British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $3 billion in fines for promoting its best-selling antidepressants for unapproved uses and failing to report safety data about a top diabetes drug, federal prosecutors announced Monday. The agreement also includes civil penalties for improper marketing of a half-dozen other drugs.

The fine against GlaxoSmithKline over Paxil, Wellbutrin, Avandia and the other drugs makes this year a record for money recovered by the federal government under its so-called whistle-blower law, according to a group that tracks such numbers.

In May, Abbott Laboratories settled for $1.6 billion over its marketing of the antiseizure drug Depakote. And an agreement with Johnson & Johnson that could result in a fine of as much as $2 billion is said to be imminent over its off-label promotion of an antipsychotic drug, Risperdal.

No individuals have been charged in any of the cases. Even so, the Justice Department contends the prosecutions are well worth the effort — reaping more than $15 in recoveries for every $1 it spends, by one estimate.

But critics argue that even large fines are not enough to deter drug companies from unlawful behavior. Only when prosecutors single out individual executives for punishment, they say, will practices begin to change.

“What we’re learning is that money doesn’t deter corporate malfeasance,” said Eliot Spitzer, who, as New York’s attorney general, sued GlaxoSmithKline in 2004 over similar accusations involving Paxil. “The only thing that will work in my view is C.E.O.’s and officials being forced to resign and individual culpability being enforced.”

The federal whistle-blower law, officially the False Claims Act, dates to 1863 and was originally envisioned as a check on war profiteering after the Civil War.

Whistle-blowers get a share of any money recovered by the federal government. So far, according to Patrick Burns, spokesman for the whistle-blower advocacy group Taxpayers Against Fraud, at least $10 billion has been agreed to in settlements this fiscal year, which ends in September.

The settlement, which requires court approval, stems from claims made by four employees of GlaxoSmithKline, including a former senior marketing development manager for the company and a regional vice president, who tipped off the government about a range of improper practices from the late 1990s to the mid-2000s.

Prosecutors said the company had tried to win over doctors by paying for trips to Jamaica and Bermuda, as well as spa treatments and hunting excursions. In the case of Paxil, prosecutors claim GlaxoSmithKline employed several tactics aimed at promoting the use of the drug in children, including helping to publish a medical journal article that misreported data from a clinical trial.

A warning was later added to the drug that Paxil, like other antidepressants, might increase the risk of suicidal thoughts in teenagers. Prosecutors said the company had marketed Wellbutrin for conditions like weight loss and sexual dysfunction when it was approved only to treat major depressive disorder.

They said that in the case of Avandia, whose use was severely restricted in 2010 after it was linked to heart risks, the company had failed to report data from studies detailing the safety risks to the F.D.A.

“Today’s multibillion-dollar settlement is unprecedented in both size and scope,” said James M. Cole, the deputy attorney general. “It underscores the administration’s firm commitment to protecting the American people and holding accountable those who commit health care fraud.”

The initial terms of the settlement were announced in November, and Glaxo had already set aside cash for the settlement. In a statement Monday, the company said it has since changed many of its policies, including no longer rewarding sales representatives for the number of drug prescriptions sold.

Andrew Witty, the chief executive, sought to portray the illegal actions as part of the company’s past.

“Whilst these originate in a different era for the company, they cannot and will not be ignored,” he said in the statement. “On behalf of GSK, I want to express our regret and reiterate that we have learned from the mistakes that were made.”

The three criminal charges involved Paxil, Wellbutrin and Avandia and included a criminal fine of $1 billion. The remaining $2 billion involves fines in connection with a civil settlement over the sales and marketing practices of the blockbuster asthma drug Advair and several other drugs.

Part of the civil settlement also includes claims that the company overcharged the government for drugs. Glaxo did not admit any wrongdoing in the civil settlement.

Despite the large amount, $3 billion represents only a portion of what Glaxo made on the drugs. Avandia, for example, racked up $10.4 billion in sales, Paxil brought in $11.6 billion, and Wellbutrin sales were $5.9 billion during the years covered by the settlement, according to IMS Health, a data group that consults for drugmakers.

“So a $3 billion settlement for half a dozen drugs over 10 years can be rationalized as the cost of doing business,” Mr. Burns said.

Mr. Burns and others have said that to institute real change, executives must be prosecuted criminally or barred from participating in the Medicare and Medicaid programs, an action known as “exclusion.”

This has occurred in only a handful of cases, and rarely in a case involving a major pharmaceutical company. In 2011, four executives of the medical device company Synthes were sentenced to less than a year in prison for conducting clinical trials that were not authorized by the Food and Drug Administration.

That same year, the former chief executive of K.V. Pharmaceutical was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1 million for selling misbranded morphine tablets. The previous year, the Department of Health and Human Services excluded him from doing business with the federal government.

Those in the pharmaceutical industry have stressed that the activities revealed in the recent settlements occurred many years ago, and practices have changed radically since then. The Glaxo settlement includes an agreement by the company to withdraw bonuses from top executives if they engaged in or supervised illegal behavior, believed to be a first.

“That creates pressure and it creates an element of responsibility,” said Erika Kelton, who represented two of the four whistle-blowers in the Glaxo case. “I think it’s a good step in the right direction.”

 

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: July 6, 2012

 

An article on Tuesday about a fine levied on the British drug maker GlaxoSmithKline for illegal marketing of some of its drugs misstated the use of Depakote, an Abbott Laboratories drug involved in a similar case. It is an antiseizure drug, not an antipsychotic.

As Originally Reported NYTIMES. Original Author and website stated.