Posts Tagged ‘Censored news’

Top 25 Censored Stories from 2012-2013

Source: ProjectCensored.org

25. Israel Gave Birth Control to Ethiopian Immigrants Without Their Consent

In January Israel acknowledged that medical authorities have been giving Ethiopian immigrants long-term birth-control injections often without their knowledge or consent…

24. Widespread GMO Contamination: Did Monsanto Plant GMOs Before USDA Approval?

Monsanto introduced genetically modified alfalfa in a full two years before it was deregulated according to recently released evidence…

23. Transaction Tax Helps Civilize Wall Street and Lower the National Debt

In February United States senators Tom Harkin D-Iowa and Peter DeFazio D-Oregon introduced a bill to implement a new tax of three basis points that is three pennies for every hundred dollars on most nonconsumer stock trades…

22. Pennsylvania Law Gags Doctors to Protect Big Oil’s “Proprietary Secrets”

In communities affected by hydraulic fracturing or fracking people understand that this process of drilling for natural gases puts the environment and their health at risk…

21. Monsanto and India’s “Suicide Economy”

Monsanto has a long history of contamination and cover-up and in India another Monsanto cover-up is ongoing…

20. Israel Counted Minimum Calorie Needs in Gaza Blockade

Declassified documents reveal that the Israeli military calculated how many calories a typical Gazan would need to survive in order to determine how much food to supply the Gaza Strip during the blockade…

19. The Power of Peaceful Revolution in Iceland

After privatization of the national banking sector private bankers borrowed billions of dollars or ten times the size of Iceland s economy creating a huge economic bubble that doubled housing prices and made a small percentage of the population exceedingly wealthy…

18. Fracking Our Food Supply

The effects of hydraulic fracturing or fracking on food supply and the environment are slowly emerging…

17. The Creative Commons Celebrates Ten Years of Sharing and Cultural Creation

Creative Commons CC is celebrating ten years of helping writers artists technologists and other creators share their knowledge and creativity with the world…

16. Journalism Under Attack Around the Globe

Journalists are increasingly at risk of being killed or imprisoned for doing their jobs a situation that imperils press freedom…

15. Food Riots: The New Normal?

Reduced land productivity combined with elevated oil costs and population growth threaten a systemic global food crisis…

14. Wireless Technology a Looming Health Crisis

As a multitude of hazardous wireless technologies are deployed in homes schools and workplaces government officials and industry representatives continue to insist on their safety despite growing evidence to the contrary…

13. A Fifth of Americans Go Hungry

An August Gallup poll showed that percent of Americans lacked sufficient money for needed food at least once over the previous year…

12. The US Has Left Iraq with an Epidemic of Cancers and Birth Defects

High levels of lead mercury and depleted uranium are believed to be causing birth defects miscarriages and cancer for people living in the Iraqi cities of Basra and Fallujah…

11. Bush Blocked Iran Nuclear Deal

According to a former top Iranian negotiator Seyed Hossein Mousavian in Iran offered a deal to the United States France Germany and the United Kingdom that would have made it impossible for Iran to build nuclear weapons…

10. A “Culture of Cruelty” along Mexico–US Border

Migrants crossing the Mexico US border not only face dangers posed by an unforgiving desert but also abuse at the hands of the US Border Patrol…

9. Icelanders Vote to Include Commons in Their Constitution

In October Icelanders voted in an advisory referendum regarding six proposed policy changes to the Constitution…

8. Bank Interests Inflate Global Prices by 35 to 40 Percent

A stunning thirty-five to forty percent of everything we buy goes to interest…

7. Merchants of Death and Nuclear Weapons

The Physicians for Social Responsibility released a study estimating that one billion people one-seventh of the human race could starve over the decade following a single nuclear detonation…

6. Billionaires’ Rising Wealth Intensifies Poverty and Inequality

As a direct result of existing financial policies the world s one hundred richest people grew to be billion richer in…

5. Hate Groups and Anti-Government Groups on Rise across US

The Southern Poverty Law Center SPLC which monitors hate groups and antigovernment groups released a report showing that radical antigovernment patriot groups and militias actively operate within the United States…

4. Obama’s War on Whistleblowers

Obama signed both the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act expanding whistleblower protections in November and the National Defense Authorization Act NDAA furthering these protections in January…

3. Trans-Pacific Partnership Threatens a Regime of Corporate Global Governance

The Trans-Pacific Partnership TPP branded as a trade agreement and negotiated in unprecedented secrecy is actually an enforceable transfer of sovereignty from nations and their people to foreign corporations…

2. Richest Global 1 Percent Hide Trillions in Tax Havens

The global percent hold twenty-one to thirty-two trillion dollars in offshore havens in order to evade taxes according to James S Henry the former chief economist at the global management consulting firm McKinsey Company…

1. Bradley Manning and the Failure of Corporate Media

In February United States military intelligence analyst Bradley Manning confessed in court to providing vast archives of military and diplomatic files to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks saying he wanted the information to become public to make the world a better place and that he hoped to spark a domestic debate on the role of the military in US foreign policy…

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Yemen’s Tattered Reality After ‘Fairytale’ Revolution: Photographic Perspectives

Global Research, November 05, 2012
jewish-quarter-yemen

A year on from the Arab Spring, supposed to usher in a new era for Yemen, for most it is a perilous time. With no clear direction, it is plagued by instability and lawlessness, allowing it to fall prey to further US military expansion.

The unrest brought about by the Arab Spring triggered numerous political transitions throughout the Middle East and North Africa in 2011. In Yemen, the only state in the Arabian Peninsula to have a republican form of government, President Ali Abdullah Saleh was deposed after 33 years in power, and replaced by his deputy, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi.

After nearly a year since this political transition, Yemen continues to face food insecurity, impoverishment and the threat of violent extremism from Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and other Islamist militias. Guns are everywhere in the country’s capital, Sana’a, and several government ministries are abandoned and riddled with bullet holes. Once frequented by foreign tourists, political instability has left Yemen’s rich historical sites abandoned.

In the country’s sparsely-populated and oil-rich south, formerly known as the Democratic People’s Republic of Yemen, citizens of the once-communist state advocate separatism and independence from unified Yemen.

While many argue that 2011’s political transition failed to produce any tangible change in direction, the United States has backed the new administration and continues to implement a program of drone strikes in Yemen’s rural areas, despite reports of substantial civilian causalities. While the country continues to be plagued by instability and lawlessness, a cloud of uncertainty hangs over Yemen as Washington eyes to further increase its military presence in the Arab state.

A portrait of deposed President Ali Abdullah Saleh hangs from an abandoned government ministry in the Hassaba district in downtown Sana′a. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
A portrait of deposed President Ali Abdullah Saleh hangs from an abandoned government ministry in the Hassaba district in downtown Sana’a. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Worshipers pass time in an alleyway nearby a mosque in the old city of Sana’a below flyers depicting Yemen’s current President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Al-Hadi. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Worshipers pass time in an alleyway nearby a mosque in the old city of Sana’a below flyers depicting Yemen’s current President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Al-Hadi. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Property in downtown Sana’a has been deserted since being damaged in fighting between government forces and tribal militias during 2011’s unrest. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Property in downtown Sana’a has been deserted since being damaged in fighting between government forces and tribal militias during 2011’s unrest. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Former President Saleh remains a revered figure among many the poor and merchant classes, as his photograph and propaganda can be seen hung in small businesses throughout the capital. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Former President Saleh remains a revered figure among many the poor and merchant classes, as his photograph and propaganda can be seen hung in small businesses throughout the capital. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Yemen’s derelict Ministry of Industry & Trade in ruins following the Arab Spring. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Yemen’s derelict Ministry of Industry & Trade in ruins following the Arab Spring. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Life has returned to normal in inner city communities almost a year after the ouster of President Saleh. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Life has returned to normal in inner city communities almost a year after the ouster of President Saleh. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The destruction of Yemen’s state-run Public Corporation for Agricultural Services and other institutions like it pose difficult challenges for Yemeni leadership in providing services and steering economic activity. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The destruction of Yemen’s state-run Public Corporation for Agricultural Services and other institutions like it pose difficult challenges for Yemeni leadership in providing services and steering economic activity. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The sale of Khat, an amphetamine-like stimulant and appetite suppressant, is the backbone of Yemen’s economy; users often chew leaves until their cheeks become enflamed. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The sale of Khat, an amphetamine-like stimulant and appetite suppressant, is the backbone of Yemen’s economy; users often chew leaves until their cheeks become enflamed. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Economic activity in rural areas relies almost entirely on the cultivation and sale of Khat; an elderly man walks to the local Khat dealer in Wadi Dhahr. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Economic activity in rural areas relies almost entirely on the cultivation and sale of Khat; an elderly man walks to the local Khat dealer in Wadi Dhahr. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Scenes of urban poverty are commonplace in Sana’a, one of the oldest populated places in the world, as the Hadi administration struggles to enforce order. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Scenes of urban poverty are commonplace in Sana’a, one of the oldest populated places in the world, as the Hadi administration struggles to enforce order. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Beggars live in abandoned automobiles on the outskirts of Sana’a. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Beggars live in abandoned automobiles on the outskirts of Sana’a. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The pristine Saleh Mosque, the largest and most modern mosque in the country, was constructed by Yemen’s former president and holds 40,000 people. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The pristine Saleh Mosque, the largest and most modern mosque in the country, was constructed by Yemen’s former president and holds 40,000 people. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Yemen’s Saleh Mosque has come under criticism for its apparent size and opulence; $60 million was spent on the mosque’s construction despite the nation’s austere poverty. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Yemen’s Saleh Mosque has come under criticism for its apparent size and opulence; $60 million was spent on the mosque’s construction despite the nation’s austere poverty. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
A Yemeni solider examines photographs of victims of a suicide bombing that killed 90 people at a military parade rehearsal in Yemen′s capital in May 2012; Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) is accused of carrying out the attack. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
A Yemeni solider examines photographs of victims of a suicide bombing that killed 90 people at a military parade rehearsal in Yemen’s capital in May 2012; Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) is accused of carrying out the attack. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Customers sit outside a fish market on Socotra Island waiting for the day’s catch. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Customers sit outside a fish market on Socotra Island waiting for the day’s catch. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
A Socotran fisherman converses with a customer in Soqotri, an ancient unwritten language of pre-Islamic origin. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
A Socotran fisherman converses with a customer in Soqotri, an ancient unwritten language of pre-Islamic origin. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
In 2010, Yemen’s government allowed the United States to militarize Socotra Island to combat Somali pirates, despite the area being recognized by (UNESCO) as a World Natural Heritage Site for its biodiversity. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
In 2010, Yemen’s government allowed the United States to militarize Socotra Island to combat Somali pirates, despite the area being recognized by (UNESCO) as a World Natural Heritage Site for its biodiversity. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Socotra has experienced the near-collapse of its tourism industry since 2011’s unrest; the island is located at the crossroads of strategic naval waterways and major oil transit routes through the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Socotra has experienced the near-collapse of its tourism industry since 2011’s unrest; the island is located at the crossroads of strategic naval waterways and major oil transit routes through the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The flag of the Democratic People’s Republic of Yemen painted on a roadside in Socotra reading, “Yes to the South!” (Photo by Nile Bowie)
The flag of the Democratic People’s Republic of Yemen painted on a roadside in Socotra reading, “Yes to the South!” (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Socotra is historically known for its rare and spectacular plant species, many with no equivalents available anywhere else in the world, such as the Dragon Blood tree. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
Socotra is historically known for its rare and spectacular plant species, many with no equivalents available anywhere else in the world, such as the Dragon Blood tree. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
A nomadic girl sells sap from the Dragon Blood tree, which is used as a medicine among a variety of other things. (Photo by Nile Bowie)
A nomadic girl sells sap from the Dragon Blood tree, which is used as a medicine among a variety of other things. (Photo by Nile Bowie)

Nile Bowie for RT

Nile Bowie is a Kuala Lumpur-based American writer and photographer for the Centre for Research on Globalization in Montreal, Canada. He explores issues of terrorism, economics and geopolitics.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, economic, scientific, and educational issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to:

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.

If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

Silver Lining

Press TV

Tens of thousands of Bahraini protesters have rallied near the capital, Manama, to demand the release of jailed activists.

The anti-regime demonstration, dubbed “Freedom and Democracy,” was held near a motorway connecting Shia villages with the capital on Friday, AFP reported.

Witnesses say the demonstrators waved Bahraini flags and pictures of jailed opposition activists, including human rights activist Nabeel Rajab, who is sentenced to three years in prison for participating in anti-regime protests.

“We do not forget the prisoners!” the demonstrators chanted.

Bahrainis have been holding frequent demonstrations in support of political prisoners since hundreds of opposition activists were arrested as part of Manama crackdown on protests last year…

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