Posts Tagged ‘Referendum’

PN

Global Research TV
May 11, 2014

The coup-installed US-backed Yatsenyuk regime has killed Ukrainian citizens trying to exercise their democratic rights to vote peaceful in a referendum. Instead of allowing inhabitants of Krasnoarmeysk, in Donetsk Oblast, vote on their future, the US-backed Yatsenyuk regime has sent armed forces to prevent them them from voting under the pretext of anti-terrorism operations.

Who are the real terrorists? Unarmed civilians trying to vote or those so-called “EuroMaidan leaders,” like Arseniy Yatsenyuk, sending troops to threaten and kill them?

Welcome to Nulandistan…

For more information and articles about Ukraine, please visit Global Research at http://www.Global Research.ca or click the following link:

http://www.globalresearch.ca/indepthr…

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PN

RT
Mar 17, 2014

While the Crimean referendum tops world media headlines, an attempt at secession is going on in Veneto, Italy, with its major city Venice. But as it is being virtually ignored by media, people in Europe are hardly aware of what’s happening next door. READ MORE: http://on.rt.com/7f5f3n

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[related: Venice votes in referendum on splitting from Rome]

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By Refugees International
The referendum on southern Sudan’s secession from the north took place as scheduled in January of this year, with over 98% of southerners voting for an independent south Sudan. This is seen as a promise of change in the lives of southerners, who suffered through decades of war and the displacement that went with it for millions of them.

The transition to independence in July may not be entirely peaceful, however, as violent clashes continue not only in the transitional area of Abyei territory, coveted by both North and South, but also in several southern states.

Some of the clashes are indigenous disputes over land and cattle between neighboring ethnic groups, sub-groups and clans. In recent years the toll in terms of casualties and displaced is higher due to the exponential growth in the availability of automatic firearms.

Other violence appears at first glance to have nothing to do with Sudan: southern Sudanese in Western and Central Equatoria states suffer from destructive raids by the Lord’s Resistance Army, an armed opposition group from northern Uganda. The LRA now operates in a vast area straddling the borders between Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic. Its attacks often involve kidnapping of children to be turned into soldiers and provoke displacement in all three countries. Seemingly an outside actor, the LRA in fact received support during the war from Khartoum, which is strongly suspected of continuing that covert support even today.

In contrast, the Khartoum government is very clear in its intentions concerning Abyei: to maintain control of this oil-rich territory by assisting the cattle-herding Misseriya tribe in their fight to keep Abyei part of Southern Kordofan. Northerners argue that the territory was never part of the south – in the administrative map upon Sudan’s independence in 1956, Abyei fell within the boundaries of Kordofan. Southerners insist that it should nonetheless be consider part of the south because the Ngok Dinka majority of the settled population of Abyei is southern, indeed part of the south’s largest ethnic group.

And then there is the series of rebellions in several southern states. Seemingly based on local grievances against the semi-autonomous government of southern Sudan, the rebellions are strongly suspected of receiving support from elements of the government in Khartoum who – according to the current speculation – want at the very least to ensure that the future Republic of South Sudan is weak and divided and thereby more easily manipulated by Khartoum.

One of the latest of rebellions to spark has been in oil-rich Unity State, the scene of massive displacement and human rights violations during the war. The leader of the supposedly local uprising is none other than Peter Gadet, notorious during the war years for his leadership of a Khartoum-backed militia group that cleared thousands of people out of vast swaths of land to make way for oil installations and the pipeline. Some of the rebel leaders in other states have similarly sordid histories. Hence the impression that despite the six-year-old Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), the war is making a comeback in the lives of southern Sudanese.

The U.S. government needs to up the pressure on Khartoum and Juba to complete the CPA process and, more specifically, to make the political compromises necessary to stop the violence.

By Peter Orr, Senior advocate at Refugees International

10th January, 2011 – Rebecca-Anne Fowler

The second day of referendum voting for Southern Sudanese in Australia has started again at 8am this morning. 

Last night i was invited by one of my Southern Sudanese friends William, to attend a celebration/meeting of Southern Communites after the first day of referendum voting ended.  The night was a mix of speech’s, dancing and celebration for the coming months ahead.

Speech’s were given by elders and leaders, women were dancing and singing and the mood was electric, the theme: A New Sudan. When anyone mentioned a New Sudan the place erupted into cheers, it was amazing to see the Unity of the Southern Sudanese Tribes in this room.   I myself was even called to give a speech. This was totally out of the blue and not expected. I did my best unprepared speech and got a huge round of applause. I felt so welcomed by all who attended.

It was also a great night for me to catch up with a few of my students and others whom i met at the Youth Conference in Sydney in NOV. I got to catch up with the wonderful Mr John Garang (not the late of course) and he was dressed in his military attire. He was happy to pose for a photo with one of his friends. 

After speaking with a few of the attendee’s last night, i got a brief feeling that the general consensus for this vote will be a separation. One of the speakers said “The Late John Garang fought for this freedom for us, our fathers, mothers, sisters and brothers who were killed in the war have fought for this for us, now it is our turn to fight for them by voting in the referendum for separation.” Words than rang so true with most of the attendee’s.

I also spoke with a former “lost boy” who whilst not going into full details of his life, i could see that it had taken a devastating toll on the life of many. This particular gentleman now works for ActionAid and is doing great things here in Australia for his own community and many other communities around the world. It is so inspiring to know that someone who has been tested in the most atrocious  of ways in life, has come through and is now giving back to community. I am inspired and at awe of these wonderful resiliant people who have come through devastating times to find some hope in their future. It simply amazes me.

This Tuesday i will be heading into the referendum centre here in Homebush Sydney and will be speaking with some Southern Sudanese on their hopes and dreams for the referendum. I feel so simply honored to be able to be a part of their lives here in Australia and to share their stories with the world is truly a blessing for me.

This year i hope to start writing a book with a few of my students, their life stories. Its going to be an amazing year for the Southern Sudanese communities and i wish them all the hope and happiness for their futures.

-Freeuganda

 

Speakers and Woman Dancing at Celebration

All Photographs Copyrighted to Rebecca-Anne Fowler. Please DO NOT Distribute WITHOUT Permission

The Canberra Registration Centre Location
Copland Building
The Australian National University (ANU)

Monday 15 Nov to Wednesday 1 Dec

Monday – Saturday
(08:00 am – 05:00pm)
Sunday
(12:00pm – 05:00pm)

The Sydney Registration Sub – Centre Location
The Waratah Room
Sydney Olympic Park Hockey Centre
Olympic Park Sydney

Parking is at (P4) on the map and trains stop at the Olympic Park station.
Mon 15 Nov to Wednesday 1 Dec

Monday – Saturday
(08:00 am – 05:00pm)
Sunday
(12:00pm – 05:00pm)

The Melbourne Registration Centre Location
Meaklim Pavilion
Melbourne Showgrounds
Enter by Gate 7
Leonard Crescent (off Langs Road)
Ascot Vale

Monday 15 Nov to Wednesday 1 Dec

Monday – Saturday
(08:00 am – 05:00pm)
Sunday
(12:00pm – 05:00pm)

For further details:

* Email ausinfo@iom.int
* Ring 1800 938 936 or
* Visit www.southernsudanocv.org

In recent weeks there have been requests  for new Sudanese Referendum Registration Centres to be opened around Australia.  As Australia is such a vast country and therefore should have registration centres in each state.  Due to the calls for more centres, 2 new centres have been arranged and are in the process of opening in the coming days.

HR Manager, David Miche’l from the The International Organization for Migration in Canberra has confirmed this morning that new Referendum Registration Centres will be opened in Australia. Two (2) new locations have been confirmed in Brisbane, QLD and Perth, WA.

Brisbane Location is (CBD):

Hospitality Suite, Exhibition Hall 1

Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

Merivale St, Southbank QLD

Brisbane Registrations will be opened from  Tuesday 23rd November (an exact time frame on how long they will remain open is not yet available)

PERTH LOCATION is due to be released this week and an updated post will be submitted as soon as information is received.

For more information about the REFERENDUM in SUDAN please Click HERE

This morning i found out through one of my Sudanese Students that the registration for Southern Sudan Referendum voting has been placed on HOLD in Australia and the USA.

From what i am aware after speaking with a few other NGO’s and crisis hub, the reason for this is due to the fact that the Council are meeting to decide on whether they will open more registration centres in Australia and the USA. An urgent meeting is due to take place in the next 24-48 hours and the outcome of this will be made public and the voting registrations should then be opened.

I can only hope this is not a ploy of the north to yet again hamper efforts to hold this referendum on time. In the last few weeks, tensions have risen, Northern Bahr El Gahzal state has been bombed under “false pretenses” and reports of southerners returning to the south being abducted by northerns posing as local tribesmen.

My students today seemed very concered about this move to place the registrations on hold here and abroad. They do beleive that this could ultimately affect the holding of the referendum and without registering on time they will miss their opportunity to vote for a ‘New Sudan’.

I pray for freedom and liberties of my good friends and hope that peace can surely come to their land.

Freeuganda

 

7th November 2010;  © Copyright Rebecca Fowler

Sydney Baha’i Centre in Silverwater came alive last night (saturday 6th November) as the Bahr El Gahzar Community of NSW Youth Union held their 2nd annual Culture Day.

Invited by a student that i work with through the HARDA African Mens English Project, i was enthralled in culture the moment i walked through the doors.

Arriving at around 6.15pm i was greeted by some 500+ Bahr El Gahzar community members. Speech’s were made by community leaders and Youth leaders and songs from the homeland sung to unite the community. I was engaged in cultural dancing and song. A local Bahr El Gahzar rap group of Youth’s took to the stage and the atmosphere turned electric. As soon as these youth picked up the microphones the crowd went wild. they belted out their tune singing about a “New Sudan” and “Unity” between the Southern Sudanese. It was a great moment, part of it i was able to capture on video but due to the noise of the screams had to cut it short…VIDEO HERE

The Youth Leaders spoke to the youth of the community about how they need to use their time in Australia for good. To stick with their education and be motivated by the prospects of a New Sudan in the year ahead. Supporting the referendum in January was also high on the list, as well as keeping the youth off the streets.

As a westerner looking in on African Culture it seems we are not so different. The challenges they face with their youth here are exactly what we face with our youth. Our culture is as baffling and confusing to them as theirs is to us and yet they carry on each day with such resiliance and motivation it needs to be commended. Imagine coming from a very rural village to a major city bustling with trains, cars, traffic, traffic jams, accidents, sirens, complete and utter chaos is basically how you could describe the transition.  But it has its up side, our country is at peace, and unfortunately Sudan is not. Decades of war have taken its toll on these people and the only way to sustain their lives and culture was to leave their homeland and seek shelter in a country of peace. We are so lucky to have such resiliant visitors to our shores, let us hear of their stories, learn a bit about them and their cultures and you will find they are just sooo much like us. Family is important, community is important, love, friendship, fun, entertainment, dancing, singing, you would be utterly surprised how alike we are. Aside from skin colour, we are all similar and i really don’t know how people cannot see this.

Coming from Rural Sudan to Blacktown City of Australia must be a huge and amazing change of life and circumstances. Blacktown City is a vast city that has expanded massivly in the last 30 years. I should know, i was born here. As a local Blacktowner i have seen my town grown into a vast city, seen our vast array of bushland be cleared for Urban development, seen our infastructure fall behind due to the vast rise of population and seen the massive change in the community. The Southern Sudanese who have came here have done a remarkable job to adjust to the hustle and bustle of Australian life after years of living in war torn areas. We don’t realise being Australians how confusing our rail or bus system can be to a new Australian. How our tax system can boggle their minds and how even using our vast array of electrical knick knacks can seem like you need to take course to use it.

After my experience last night, being welcomed into the Bahr El Gahzar community i feel so completely honored and motivated. I hope that in January of 2011, A New Sudan will emerge through the referendum and my dear friends who would love to return to their homeland are able to do so as free and democratic citizens of a “New Sudan”.

FreeUganda (Apologies for the poor quality footage, my video camera is requiring a new charger cable)