Posts Tagged ‘refugees’

There is no Palestinian issue for Syrian rebels

Nadezhda Kevorkova is a war correspondent who has covered the events of the Arab Spring, military and religious conflicts around the world, and the anti-globalization movement.

Published time: November 10, 2013 21:18

A handout picture released by the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) on May 15, 2013, shows protestors crying after unidentified armed groups opened fire on demonstrators as they marched in the Syrian capital Damascus in support of the right to return of Palestinian refugees who fled their homes or were expelled during various conflicts. (AFP/SANA)A handout picture released by the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) on May 15, 2013, shows protestors crying after unidentified armed groups opened fire on demonstrators as they marched in the Syrian capital Damascus in support of the right to return of Palestinian refugees who fled their homes or were expelled during various conflicts. (AFP/SANA)

The Palestinian issue has been uniting all Muslims for 65 years. Syrian rebels succeeded in their mission – they made the world forget about the Palestinian issue.

The militants pulled Palestinians out of refugee camps; they are killing them or using these people as human shields. And the media are silent about it, while the Syrian opposition keeps screaming about the “oppressive Assad regime.”

It’s been a year since Syrian rebels raided the largest Palestinian refugee camp in Syria – Yarmouk, near Damascus. Up until recently it was the duty of Israeli soldiers to persecute Palestinians, now this is done by Syrian rebels with their Muslim slogans. The media are not saying anything about it.

What is the life of Palestinians like, now that the Syrian conflict made them refugees again?

‘Nobody is helping us – neither Europe, nor the UN’

Abu-Badr, head of Beirut’s Bourj al-Barajneh refugee camp People’s Committee, gathered representatives of all Palestinian parties. They all keep regular contacts with camps in Syria.

A year after Palestinian camps and Palestinians were attacked, the heads of these organizations are saying that the Syrian war is a staged conflict, and its goal is to distract everybody from the Palestinian problem.

A total of 760,000 Palestinian refugees lived in Syria before the war, and about 550,000 in Lebanon. Palestinians had equal rights in Syria, and virtually no rights in Lebanon. For example, they were not allowed to work in 72 professional capacities.

Abu-Badr says, “There are over 1,000 Palestinian families from Syria in our camp. Nobody is helping us – not Europe, not the UN. The Red Cross came twice. The refugees are renting housing on their own.”

To rent a place to live is a big problem for a Palestinian, especially at the camp. And to pay rent, they have to find a job, which is extremely difficult in Lebanon.

He says that according to the authorities, there are about 120,000 Palestinian refugees from Syria living south of Tripoli. So every tenth refugee is a Palestinian.

Turkey and Jordan don’t accept Palestinians.

Kafar is a young mother of two. She used to live in Syria’s Yarmouk with her family. Now she is struggling to survive in Bourj al-Barajneh in Lebanon.

She fled Yarmouk at the end of 2012, when the rebels took over the camp and made it their foothold to carry out attacks on Damascus.

 

Palestinian refugee women from Syria plays are seen outside their tents at Ain al-Helweh Palestinian refugee camp near the port-city of Sidon, southern Lebanon (Reuters/Ali Hashisho)Palestinian refugee women from Syria plays are seen outside their tents at Ain al-Helweh Palestinian refugee camp near the port-city of Sidon, southern Lebanon (Reuters/Ali Hashisho)

Yarmouk is one of the largest Palestinian camps in Syria. Before the war it had 150,000 residents, which was almost one-quarter of all Palestinian refugees in Syria. The camp is very close to the Damascus city limits, and there were subdivisions where regular Syrians lived.

Refugee camps are extraterritorial places. Police and army are not allowed there, the residents don’t have citizenship, they don’t vote and don’t serve in the army. Camps are self-governed by representatives of all Palestinian political parties. Unlike all other countries, Syria allowed refugees to leave camps and enjoy all rights and freedoms.

A Syrian family named Lakud brought the fighters to Yarmouk. Palestinians didn’t support the rebels then, and they are not supporting them now. Some parts of the camp are still controlled by the opposition.

A human shield for militants

Kafar recalls: “The entire camp left in a snap back then, when armed militants entered it. They were inside, shooting bullets into the air – they always act the same way. They ordered the residents to leave having placed their orders on different websites and having sent emails. Nobody stayed there.”

In December 2012, some started trying to come back. There are even a few families that decided to stay in the camp, hoping it would get better soon. Kafar says all the houses have been looted – they have taken everything, including electrical wires.

She says the militants were shooting those Palestinians who went out to take part in demonstrations. They wouldn’t let people return to their homes, but in case they did come back home, they couldn’t leave their houses again.

“If the militants went away, we would come back. Sometimes we can contact those inside the camp. They tell us about the blockade – they feel like they live in a cage, they lack food. There is no escape – they are kept as a human shield for the militants,” Kafar says.

 

Syrian rebels (AFP Photo)Syrian rebels (AFP Photo)

 

She tells us about her relative who went to find her children, but ended up as a hostage in the camp.

“The militants won’t let you come in, but if one has entered – he would be kept there by force. They have established checkpoints. They deprive the people of food and beat the women who try to sneak inside, bringing something to their relatives to eat,” Kafar says.

Hitting a woman in public is considered absolutely unlawful among Muslims. But Kafar says that the militants in Yarmouk have their own vision of everything.

“We are not afraid of war, but they won’t even feed the people. The al-Nusra militants are tall, wear long beards and look like foreigners. Probably, there are Syrians among them but none of my relatives have ever seen one,” Kafar says.

One blanket for five

Palestinians from Syria in Lebanon are in even more dire straits.

“They humiliate us – we are constantly being insulted,” the woman tells us.

She is showing us around her tiny apartment with two rooms and a kitchen. The ceiling leaks when it rains.

“The rent is $300. If I don’t find money by Sunday, we’ll have to leave for Syria.”

Apart from the rent, they pay $70 for water.

Her father-in-law was killed. Her mother-in-law returned to Syria and now lives with their relatives there.

“I’ll go to Syria and wait there until I can come back home. Staying here is humiliating,” Kafar says.

Her husband takes up any job he can, be it a laborer, carrier or loader.

They have no warm clothes – all their belongings were stolen in Yarmouk. This family doesn’t belong to any group. They got help from different organizations such as Hamas, the Popular Front or some voluntary organizations. But it can hardly be called help – it is more like a mere pittance.

“They gave us one blanket for five people. But we are living creatures,” Kafar says, showing us a thin grey synthetic blanket. She thinks it looks like a cloth that is used to wrap a dead body when burying it.

The family has no money to buy food. They sometimes receive help from neighbors, who share their food with them. I saw them bring some bread and crisps.

‘In Syria, Palestinians are treated better than brothers’

Kafar complains about how the refugee work is organized.

“They distribute some humanitarian aid, but the process is humiliating to us every step of the way. There is fighting in Syria, but Palestinians are respected there. And here they call us Syrian dogs.”

“We had a good life under Assad, not lacking anything. We will go back and live in Syria, even if we have to live in tents. Syrians treat us as equal, they help us,” says Kafar.

In the last year they received help twice – from Hamas and from people from Qatar – about $300 per family, which is less than one dollar a day. But not everybody gets even these payments. There are lists of those who suffer the most in these camps.

She tells us how the process of distributing this aid works.

“A family gets a check for $150 from Qatar. But there wasn’t enough for everybody on the list. So people are humiliated even more. The place where these checks are given is near Beirut, you have to take a taxi to get there and spend half of the money on the ride. They give food stamps for certain food items, which can only be bought in one supermarket. And this store is also far away.”

 

A Palestinian refugee boy from Syria plays with a tyre as another boy walks past tents at Ain al-Helweh Palestinian refugee camp near the port-city of Sidon, southern Lebanon (Reuters/Ali Hashisho)A Palestinian refugee boy from Syria plays with a tyre as another boy walks past tents at Ain al-Helweh Palestinian refugee camp near the port-city of Sidon, southern Lebanon (Reuters/Ali Hashisho)

“You can’t buy meat with these food stamps. Do they think children can go for a year without meat?” the woman asks.

 “We are convinced that Syria will welcome us back. They loved us there, treated us like brothers, even better than brothers. We lived better than Syrians themselves,” Kafar says.

She knows that the Lebanese have closed the border for Palestinian refugees. So they can’t go anywhere.

“They accepted us in Syria. When we lost everything, they took care of us. They asked us what we needed. Six blankets? Food? They gave us everything. They didn’t blame us, even though life was difficult for everyone.”

She thinks her family made a mistake when it moved to Lebanon. “We were told life would be good here. Now we regret the decision.”

Her husband came six months earlier, he thought they would be safe here while there is fighting.

‘There is no Palestinian issue for Syrian rebels’

“We Palestinians have played no part in Syria’s distress. We didn’t participate in street protests, and our people did not join the rebels,” says Kafar. She admits to having heard that some Palestinians have, in fact, taken up arms against the Syrian government. But she is certain that is a rare exception.

“Those people must have been seduced by money, or befuddled with drugs, and with false promises. Only the poorest and the most destitute of the Palestinians have gone to fight for money, and it took them 18 months to get that desperate.

“Such people have nothing to eat, so they join the rebels hoping to make some money to sustain their families, and then desert at the first opportunity.”

“We cannot admit to supporting the regime, for fear of being killed on the spot. Those rebels do not consider the Palestinian issue to be of primary importance. There is no Palestinian issue for the rebels at all,” says Kafar.

Every night, the inhabitants of Bourj al-Barajneh go to sleep fearing that al-Nusra militants may descend on the Palestinian refugee camp and start asserting their rule, the way they did at Yarmouk. There is talk that al-Nusra men were spotted recently inside Nahr al-Barrid, another Palestinian camp. Since then, the People’s Committee instituted vigilante patrols across the entire camp.

“Our people control every in and out,” Kafar tells us. “They keep watch at night to make sure no strangers come upon us as we sleep. That’s how it happened in Yarmouk.”

The Syrian army has also set up checkpoints guarding the entrance to each camp.

‘They butchered a family to make the others serve as a human shield’

Yarmouk was not the only Palestinian camp captured and cleared of refugees by insurgents. Moreover, no one can assess the number of Palestinians killed in the process.

A Palestinian woman named Gusun was forced to flee camp Duma near Damascus on September 23, 2012, together with her husband, their three kids, and her husband’s brother.

“There were plenty of olive groves next to our camp. We lived in peace for a long time, until the fighting drew close to our camp. Then, rebels started taking shelter in our camp, hiding in our houses during firefights, and shooting through our windows. And we found ourselves between the hammer and the anvil. So one day, we slipped out at five in the morning and ran away through the olive grove,” Gursun tells me.

 

Free Syrian Army fighter (Reuters/Muzaffar Salman)Free Syrian Army fighter (Reuters/Muzaffar Salman)

“The rebels had killed many people in our camp unflinchingly. They butchered a married couple who were my husband’s kin – they cut their throats, so that the other Palestinians would stay in the camp and serve as their human shield, while the government was commanding us to flee.”

Gusun went back to check on Duma some four months ago.

“I found my home thoroughly looted, its roof smashed,” she recalls. “And the FSA and al-Nusra are still entrenched in the camp.”

“Once their men spotted me at Duma, they came up and questioned me to make sure I was from that camp. They let me go, but they kept watching me. Later, when I went out to a grocery store, I noticed a car tailing me. Then I got scared and ran away from the camp,” says Gusun.

“The rebels I saw were tall and fair-skinned. There are some who don’t speak Arabic, and there are some who do. People have also told me there are black rebels, but I have never seen one. Some rebels wear black vests, some wear masks, some wear short pants, and others wear normal trousers. There are many fair-skinned men among them, those are foreigners.

“When we walked around the camp, we would try not to look them in the face, for fear that they might do us harm,” Gusun says.

‘Palestinians, get out of Syria’

The world’s mainstream media, who have closely followed the insurgency and its war on Assad, have proven squeamish when it comes to covering the way rebels treat Palestinians. In the spring of 2011, they would refute news reports that opposition activists wave Israeli flags and chant anti-Palestinian slogans at their rallies.

This stands to reason: two years ago, the Palestinian issue was still the No. 1 concern for the Muslim world, and an anti-Palestinian stance would have done serious harm to the rebels’ reputation. All the more so as Egyptian revolutionaries at Tahrir Square had been pronouncedly pro-Palestinian, despising Hosni Mubarak for his support for the Israeli blockade of the Gaza Strip.

The women at Bourj al-Barajneh are perplexed at the world’s ignorance of how Syrian insurgents really feel about Palestinians.

“At the onset of the revolution, slogans were like, ‘Carrots belong with carrots and cabbage with cabbage, and this is no land for Palestinians’,” says Gusun, who is shocked that no media have ever reported that the Syrian rebels had initially been against the Palestinians.

“Under these slogans, the armed rebels marched along the streets, angered by the local Palestinians’ reluctance to turn against the regime,” says Gusun.

“In about a year and a half, some Palestinians were in this way or another made to join the rebels. But that didn’t change much the rebels’ opinion of the Palestinians,” remarks Gusun, adding that even now the Palestinians on the side of the rebels are few and far between.

 

Palestinian refugee children from Syria stands outside tents at Ain al-Helweh Palestinian refugee camp near the port-city of Sidon, southern Lebanon (Reuters/Ali Hashisho)Palestinian refugee children from Syria stands outside tents at Ain al-Helweh Palestinian refugee camp near the port-city of Sidon, southern Lebanon (Reuters/Ali Hashisho)

She can’t understand the reason why the Lebanese are treating Palestinians like that. After all, Syria did give shelter to 1 million Lebanese and Palestinian refugees after the 2006 Israeli attack.

“During the 2006 war we welcomed the Palestinians like family. But now we are being treated as outsiders.”

At that time, all the refugees from Lebanon found home, food and clothes straight on arrival.

Gusun was lucky to have found a job, and so was her husband. “I had to work as a cleaning lady. I’d never done anything like that before. But we had to survive somehow. The UN gives only $30 once every four months.’

It was crucial for the sponsors of the anti-Syrian campaign to shift the focus of one and a half billion Muslims from Palestine to the war against Assad. And their mission almost succeeded.

The issue of Palestine used to bring everyone together: Communists and atheists, the Sunni and the Shia, Christians and Muslims, left- and right-wingers, anti-globalists and nationalists. Now the war in Syria has torn them all apart.

Fast forward two years, there are no more rallies against the occupation of Jerusalem, no ships trying to break through the Gaza Strip and the West Bank blockade. In the meantime, this blockade has grown even tougher after the military coup in Egypt, with the abuse of Palestinians in the West Bank escalating into ethnic cleansing.

The sponsors of the war repeatedly tried to get Palestinians to back intervention into Syria. But their efforts failed: from Hamas to the Palestinian Islamic Jihad to the Popular Front to Fatah, not a single Palestinian organization has ever supported the campaign.

Source: rt.com

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Activists ring alarm: Refugees face torture and exploitation in post-Gaddafi Libya

Published: 14 November, 2012, 06:01

A man sits at at a camp for refugees from Tawargha in Benghazi January 31, 2012.(Reuters / Esam Al-Fetori)
 

A man sits at at a camp for refugees from Tawargha in Benghazi January 31, 2012.(Reuters / Esam Al-Fetori)

Foreign nationals without proper documentation are being exploited, indefinitely detained or even tortured, Amnesty International reports. According to Amnesty the conditions for undocumented foreigners are worse than in the Gaddafi era.

The Amnesty International report says refugees, asylum seekers and migrants in Libya are being subjected to serious human rights violations that extend far beyond what they experienced under Muammar Gaddafi.

“It is shameful that Gaddafi-era abuses against foreigners, especially those from Sub-Saharan Africa, have not only continued but worsened,” Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, Deputy Middle East and North Africa Director at Amnesty International, said at the briefing “We are foreigners, we have no rights.”

The report is based on Amnesty International fact finding visits to Libya between May and September. The trips revealed that foreign nationals are being abused by armed militias, who act outside the law.

“The Libyan authorities must acknowledge the extent of the abuse by militias and put in place measures to protect all foreign nationals from violence and abuse, regardless of their origin or immigration status,” urged Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui.

Sahraoui.

Photos of a of Amnesty International report "We are foreigners, we have no rights"
 

Migrants, asylum-seekers and refugees in Libya are absolutely unprotected by law. They can be arrested and detained in the streets, markets, checkpoints or even at home.

Some arrests are carried out by the Libyan police, but most of the operations are conducted by militiamen, who sometimes act violently, confiscating mobile phones, money and other valuables.

In detention centers foreign nationals face further humiliation. During five months Amnesty International visited nine detention centers across Libya and talked to detainees, who say they are being subjected to torture and beatings. 

Women at such centers are also vulnerable to sexual assault as none of the facilities for female detainees had female guards.
The report says that at the time of Amnesty International visits “some 2,700 foreign nationals, including pregnant women, women with young children, and unaccompanied children detained alongside adult strangers, were held for “migration-related offences”. 

A Nigerian woman told Amnesty International that she was beaten and given electric shocks while in detention. “The world needs to know what is happening to us [Sub-Saharan African nationals] in Libya. For Libyans, we are not even human. I did not do anything wrong. I just came here to work. Now I am locked up for months, and don’t know what will happen to me. There is nobody here to help me. ”

Huda Bel-Eid, a woman from Tawergha who was shot in the leg, sits in Tripoli Hospital in Libya, February 6, 2012. Bel-Eid claims that militiamen from the city of Misrata shot her as they tried to arrest other refugees. The refugees resisted and the men fired on her, she said.(Reuters / Ismail Zitouny)
Huda Bel-Eid, a woman from Tawergha who was shot in the leg, sits in Tripoli Hospital in Libya, February 6, 2012. Bel-Eid claims that militiamen from the city of Misrata shot her as they tried to arrest other refugees. The refugees resisted and the men fired on her, she said.(Reuters / Ismail Zitouny)

Post-Gaddafi violence

The Libyan authorities and militias do not make a distinction between migrants, asylum seekers and refugees, the organization says. All of them are similarly at risk of arbitrary arrest and indefinite detention. The lack of a functional asylum-system in Libya and its refusal to sign a memorandum of understanding with the UN Refugee Agency leaves tens of thousands of asylum seekers and refugees in legal uncertainty.

According to Amnesty International one of the most frequent accusations Africans face in Libya is that they were “mercenaries” for Gaddafi`s regime. Since the regime was ousted last year the government launched a crackdown on Gaddafi supporters.

In May the UN Support Mission in Libya reported that thousands of those who allegedly supported Muammar Gaddafi were detained in secret prisons. Some of the detainees were being tortured, activists said.

Meanwhile, post-Gaddafi chaos does not seem to be coming to an end with armed militia thriving throughout the country. The government forces are busy pursuing former Gaddafi supporters and failing to tackle violence in the country. In October a three week siege of Bani Walid resulted in humanitarian catastrophe in the city, as residents were left without food, power and medical supplies.

Displaced people from the city of Tawarga walk near prefabricated houses built for workers at a construction site, which is now used as a refugee camp, on the outskirts of Benghazi July 9, 2012.(Reuters / Youssef Boudlal)
Displaced people from the city of Tawarga walk near prefabricated houses built for workers at a construction site, which is now used as a refugee camp, on the outskirts of Benghazi July 9, 2012.(Reuters / Youssef Boudlal)
 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, economic, scientific, and educational issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to:

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If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

I Was forwarded this information today so i thought i would share it around the web.

Rally in Melbourne: End Indefinite Detention, End ASIO checks on Refugees

Friday, 25th May 12.30 – 1.30 ; Dept of Immigration, Casseldon Place (cnr Spring and Lonsdale Sts) Melbourne VIC

By: Refugee Action Collective

At least 56 refugees are facing indefinite detention after being declared a ‘security threat’ by ASIO. This includes two families with young children. They have no right to review or appeal the decision, nor do they have the right to know the grounds on which they have been rejected. Three Tamil refugees rejected by ASIO have attempted suicide in Broadmeadows detention centre. Alongside this mounting despair inside the camps, there is a growing chorus of outrage against this affront to natural justice. Join the Refugee Action Collective (Vic) in calling on the government to scrap ASIO checks. Refugees are threatened by persecution and danger, not a security threat. The government must act immediately to release the refugees into the community.

Link to Facebook Event Page for more information

Source: Refugee Action Collective (VIC)

By Refugees International
The referendum on southern Sudan’s secession from the north took place as scheduled in January of this year, with over 98% of southerners voting for an independent south Sudan. This is seen as a promise of change in the lives of southerners, who suffered through decades of war and the displacement that went with it for millions of them.

The transition to independence in July may not be entirely peaceful, however, as violent clashes continue not only in the transitional area of Abyei territory, coveted by both North and South, but also in several southern states.

Some of the clashes are indigenous disputes over land and cattle between neighboring ethnic groups, sub-groups and clans. In recent years the toll in terms of casualties and displaced is higher due to the exponential growth in the availability of automatic firearms.

Other violence appears at first glance to have nothing to do with Sudan: southern Sudanese in Western and Central Equatoria states suffer from destructive raids by the Lord’s Resistance Army, an armed opposition group from northern Uganda. The LRA now operates in a vast area straddling the borders between Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic. Its attacks often involve kidnapping of children to be turned into soldiers and provoke displacement in all three countries. Seemingly an outside actor, the LRA in fact received support during the war from Khartoum, which is strongly suspected of continuing that covert support even today.

In contrast, the Khartoum government is very clear in its intentions concerning Abyei: to maintain control of this oil-rich territory by assisting the cattle-herding Misseriya tribe in their fight to keep Abyei part of Southern Kordofan. Northerners argue that the territory was never part of the south – in the administrative map upon Sudan’s independence in 1956, Abyei fell within the boundaries of Kordofan. Southerners insist that it should nonetheless be consider part of the south because the Ngok Dinka majority of the settled population of Abyei is southern, indeed part of the south’s largest ethnic group.

And then there is the series of rebellions in several southern states. Seemingly based on local grievances against the semi-autonomous government of southern Sudan, the rebellions are strongly suspected of receiving support from elements of the government in Khartoum who – according to the current speculation – want at the very least to ensure that the future Republic of South Sudan is weak and divided and thereby more easily manipulated by Khartoum.

One of the latest of rebellions to spark has been in oil-rich Unity State, the scene of massive displacement and human rights violations during the war. The leader of the supposedly local uprising is none other than Peter Gadet, notorious during the war years for his leadership of a Khartoum-backed militia group that cleared thousands of people out of vast swaths of land to make way for oil installations and the pipeline. Some of the rebel leaders in other states have similarly sordid histories. Hence the impression that despite the six-year-old Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), the war is making a comeback in the lives of southern Sudanese.

The U.S. government needs to up the pressure on Khartoum and Juba to complete the CPA process and, more specifically, to make the political compromises necessary to stop the violence.

By Peter Orr, Senior advocate at Refugees International

June 9th. Together with Christina Vandenhengel of Invisible Children i gave a speech to the Local Blacktown City Lions Club at their Dinner Meeting.  We started with a 5 min speech regarding the Northern Ugandan’s and the atrocities they have been facing since approx 1986.  We then showed 2 x 5 min clips and ended with 5 mins of question time.  Selling approx 6 “rescue” Bracelets and a few other items the night was successful in raising even more awareness of the atrocities faced by the Acholi and now the Congolese and Central African Republic and Sudanese Citizens.

Since June 9th i have kept contact with Christina and kept on raising awareness for the Acholi and others facing hard times due to the LRA War. Have sent letters to MP’s and Celebrities and Twittered about it almost every day. I run website FREEUGANDA and have a current fundraiser which your donations are delivered straight to Invisible Children via Change.org a safe and secure fundraising website for Non Profits.

One night in August i checked my sms messages to find one from Christina, a very interesting message, it had me left wondering…what was this proposition she had for me?  Well it was an honor, a true blessing, to be asked to be the Company Secretary for Invisible Children Australia! My hard work had been shown, my dedication to the cause proven and it was an HONOR for me to accept the Volunteer Positon of Company Secretary of IC Aus. I take on this mission with pride, its going to be hard, long, labourous, joyful, sad, fun, exciting and so much more, who wouldnt want to be a part of such a wonderful cause dedicated to helping those less orphaned, abducted or in some way affected by the LRA War, a war that has been hardly reported on by media since 1986.

In September 2009 Invisible Children Australia Board of Directors will be having our first meeting to go over all of our fundraising, events and missions we have started.  We are here to help you with screenings and fundraising and anything you need to raise awareness for Invisible Children.

Schools for Schools has restarted for 2009 with an exciting new book drive mission through Better World Books

In the last few months the LRA have pushed Congolese over the Borders into Central African Republic as well as Sudan, murdering more civilians and abducting more children/women.

9th September: it is reported on New Vision a leading Ugandan Newspaper that a head LRA Commander was captured by the UPDF (Ugandan Peoples Defence Force) in Central African Republic and 98 abducted have been saved, as well as 4 junior LRA Leaders being killed in gunfight.  It is currently suspected that Kony is heading into the Darfur, Sudan region. Darfur is already facing its own Internally Displaced issues due to war with rebels, If Kony/LRA was to join forces with another extremist rebel group in Darfur, the atrocities we are seeing could be amplified.

What can you do to help Invisible Children see the end of this war? Lobby your Sentors (US), hold fundraisers, hold a screening of our documentaries at your school/church/youth group or even workplace! Have a house party and get everyone to donate some funds to Invisible Children. Purchase one of the many DVD’s, Tshirts, Books and more and show off your IC Style.  Write a letter to your Local Member of Parliment (Aus)

Check out Invisible Children’s website today and see how you can help the movement move forward to a brighter future for those affected by the LRA War.